US Post Office, 1789 to 1901

Statutes and Resolutions,
Treaties and Postal Conventions


Don Heller, 9 November 2023
 





The US Post Office was established by law under the Constitution, at first temporarily, 22 Sep. 1789, and then definitively, 20 Feb. 1792.  It continued as a direct function of the Government until 1971.

We have attempted to list every act, resolution, proclamation, treaty and convention bearing on the Post Office and its operation, extended to revenue collections by stamped paper and adhesive stamps, and the national currency system.  Territorial and statehood information is included.  We have not attempted to highlight only the most important acts, or to avoid seemingly trivial private acts.

References are to the US Statutes at Large, published since 1845, at first retrospectively, with notes on earlier contemporary publications.  For current use, the Revised Statutes (1875) and US Code (since 1925) should be consulted.  We have added other sources when they provide additional information.  Regulations of the Post Office are not included; for these, consult the Postal Laws and Regulations, the Official Postal Guide, and the Postal Bulletin.

The Confederate Post Office, 1861-1865, is included as a separate section, with extensive references on secession and postal actions by the individual states.



United States Statutes at Large, 1789 – 1901
Volume Congresses Dates, Contents Volume Congress Dates
1 1 – 5 1789 – 1799 19 44 1875 – 1877
2 6 – 12 1799 – 1813 20 45 1877 – 1879
3 13 – 17 1813 – 1823 21 46 1879 – 1881
4 18 – 23 1823 – 1835 22 47 1881 – 1883
5 24 – 28 1835 – 1845 23 48 1883 – 1885
6 1 – 28 1789 – 1845, Private Acts 24 49 1885 – 1887
7 --- 1778 – 1842, Treaties with the Indian Tribes 25 50 1887 – 1889
8 --- 1776 – 1845, Treaties with Foreign Nations 26 51 1889 – 1891
9 29 – 31 1845 – 1851 27 52 1891 – 1893
10 32 – 33 1851 – 1855 28 53 1893 – 1895
11 34 – 35 1855 – 1859 29 54 1895 – 1897
12 36 – 37 1859 – 1863 30 55 1897 – 1899
13 38 1863 – 1865 31 56 1899 – 1901
14 39 1865 – 1867 etc. etc. 1901 – 2022
15 40 1867 – 1869      
16 41 1869 – 1871      
17 42 1871 – 1873      
18 43 1873 – 1875; Revised Statutes      
Information and sources
Bibliographic details
Notes
Index volumes
Contents by topic
Previous collections
Related lists and compilations
Foundational documents
Revised Statutes and United States Code
Treaty Collections
Presidents and Congresses
States and Territories

Article I, Section 8, Clause 7, The Congress shall have Power ... To establish Post Offices and post roads.
Post Office Department and Postmasters General
Highlights and Lowlights, a very short and very subjective list

Tables of Postal Laws, Resolutions and Treaties, by volume
Tables of Laws and Resolutions, by topic
Further references
Homework problems
To-Do list



US Statutes at Large, Volumes 1-128, Congresses 1-113, 1789-2014

Information and sources
Bibliographic details, US Statutes at Large, vol. 1-90
Notes
Index volumes
Contents by topic Previous collections, sample volumes only Previous collection, useful for comparison, included in the Synoptical Index, 1852. Related lists and compilations Foundational documents (Organic Laws)
Revised Statutes and United States Code
Treaty Collections
As a check on the completeness of the treaties in the Statutes, we also have included a few foreign collections, most notably for Britain. Presidents and Congresses
Inauguration Dates President Congresses Volumes
30 Apr. 1789 4 Mar. 1793 George Washington 1, 2, 3, 4 1 6
7
8
4 Mar. 1797   John Adams 5, 6 1, 2
4 Mar. 1801 4 Mar. 1805 Thomas Jefferson 7, 8, 9, 10 2
4 Mar. 1809 4 Mar. 1813 James Madison 11, 12, 13, 14 2, 3
4 Mar. 1817 4 Mar. 1821 James Monroe 15, 16, 17, 18 3, 4
4 Mar. 1825   John Quincy Adams 19, 20 4
4 Mar. 1829 4 Mar. 1833 Andrew Jackson 21, 22, 23, 24 4, 5
4 Mar. 1837   Martin Van Buren 25, 26 5
4 Mar. 1841   William Henry Harrison (3) 27 5
6 Apr. 1841   John Tyler 27, 28 5
4 Mar. 1845   James K. Polk 29, 30 9
4 Mar. 1849   Zachary Taylor (1) (3) 31 9
10 July 1850   Millard Fillmore 31, 32 9, 10
4 Mar. 1853   Franklin Pierce 33, 34 10, 11
4 Mar. 1857   James Buchanan 35, 36 11, 12
4 Mar. 1861 4 Mar. 1865 Abraham Lincoln (3) 37, 38, 39 12, 13, 14
15 Apr. 1865   Andrew Johnson 39, 40 14, 15
4 Mar. 1869 4 Mar. 1873 Ulysses S. Grant 41, 42, 43, 44 16, 17, 18, 19
4 Mar. 1877   Rutherford B. Hayes (1) 45, 46 20, 21
4 Mar. 1881   James A. Garfield (3) 47 22
19 Sep. 1881   Chester A. Arthur (2) 47, 48 22, 23
4 Mar. 1885   Grover Cleveland 49, 50 24, 25
4 Mar. 1889   Benjamin Harrison 51, 52 26, 27
4 Mar. 1893   Grover Cleveland 53, 54 28, 29
4 Mar. 1897 4 Mar. 1901 William McKinley (3) 55, 56, 57 30, 31, 32
14 Sep. 1901 4 Mar. 1905 Theodore Roosevelt 57, 58, 59, 60 32, 33, 34, 35
    etc.    
(1) Mar. 4 being a Sunday, sworn in the following day
(2) sworn in the following day
(3) died in office

The White House Historical Association, Presidents (brief biographies)
Wikipedia, List of vice presidents of the United States
States and Territories
States are noted here with the date when the Constitution was ratified (first 13) or when the state was admitted to the Union with representation in Congress.  Some states were first admitted conditionally, while the Confederate states were readmitted conditionally.  We list acts, resolutions and proclamations to enable and establish a state government, admit it to the Union, and extend the existing laws of the Union to the new state.

Territories are noted here with the date when their government became official.  We list acts, resolutions and proclamations to organize a territorial government, with references to the initial purchase or annexation, and pre-territorial status.

Major boundary changes for states and territories after 1776 are included.  For the District of Columbia, see 1 Stat. 130, 16 July 1790, etc.  The various acts prescribe boundaries between the states and territories, which we quote or summarize here, but they often do not correspond to "the facts on the ground", due to imprecise geographic descriptions and knowledge, meandering rivers, and inaccurate surveys.  When in doubt, consult Van Zandt (1976), cited below.

The phrase "from and after" is abbreviated "f/a".
Territory State Provenance Territory State
Alabama Alabama (4), (7a) 25 Sep. 1817 14 Dec. 1819
Alaska Alaska (12) 24 Aug. 1912 3 Jan. 1959
Arizona Arizona (10), (11) 24 Feb. 1863 14 Feb. 1912
Arkansas Arkansas (5b) "f/a" 4 July 1819 15 June 1836
--- California (10) --- 9 Sep. 1850
Colorado Colorado (5b), (5c), (7d), (8b), (10) 28 Feb. 1861 1 Aug. 1876
--- Connecticut (1a) --- 9 Jan. 1788
--- Delaware (1a) --- 7 Dec. 1787
Florida Florida (7a), (7b) 30 Mar. 1822 3 Mar. 1845
--- Georgia (1a) --- 2 Jan. 1788
Hawaii Hawaii (13) 14 June 1900 21 Aug. 1959
Idaho Idaho (9) 3 Mar. 1863 3 July 1890
Illinois Illinois (2) "f/a" 1 Mar. 1809 3 Dec. 1818
Indiana Indiana (2) "f/a" 4 July 1800 11 Dec. 1816
Iowa Iowa (5b) "f/a" 3 July 1838 28 Dec. 1846
Kansas Kansas (5b), (5c), (8b) 30 May 1854 29 Jan. 1861
--- Kentucky (1c) --- 1 June 1792
Orleans Louisiana (5a), (7a), (7c) 1 Oct. 1804 30 Apr. 1812
--- Maine (1d) --- 15 Mar. 1820
--- Maryland (1a) --- 28 Apr. 1788
--- Massachusetts (1a) --- 6 Feb. 1788
Michigan Michigan (2) "f/a" 30 June 1805 26 Jan. 1837
Minnesota Minnesota (2), (5b), (6) "f/a" 3 Mar. 1849 11 May 1858
Mississippi Mississippi (4), (7a) 7 May 1798 10 Dec. 1817
Louisiana, Missouri Missouri (5b) 1 Oct. 1804 10 Aug. 1821
Montana Montana (5b), (9) 26 May 1864 8 Nov. 1889
Nebraska Nebraska (5b) 30 May 1854 1 Mar. 1867
Nevada Nevada (10) 2 Mar. 1861 31 Oct. 1864
--- New Hampshire (1a) --- 21 June 1788
--- New Jersey (1a) --- 18 Dec. 1787
New Mexico New Mexico (5b), (5c), (8b), (10), (11) 9 Sep. 1850 6 Jan. 1912
--- New York (1a) --- 26 July 1788
--- North Carolina (1a) --- 21 Nov. 1789
Dakota North Dakota (5b), (6) 2 Mar. 1861 2 Nov. 1889
Northwest Ohio (2) 13 July 1787 1 Mar. 1803
Oklahoma Oklahoma (5b), (5c), (8b), (8c) 2 May 1890 16 Nov. 1907
Oregon Oregon (9) 14 Aug. 1848 14 Feb. 1859
--- Pennsylvania (1a) --- 12 Dec. 1787
--- Rhode Island (1a) --- 29 May 1790
--- South Carolina (1a) --- 23 May 1788
Dakota South Dakota (5b), (6) 2 Mar. 1861 2 Nov. 1889
Southwest Tennessee (3) 26 May 1790 1 June 1796
Republic of Texas Texas (5b), (5c), (8a) --- 29 Dec. 1845
Utah Utah (10) 9 Sep. 1850 4 Jan. 1896
Vermont Republic Vermont (1b) --- 4 Mar. 1791
--- Virginia (1a) --- 25/26 June 1788
Washington Washington (9) 2 Mar. 1853 11 Nov. 1889
--- West Virginia (1e) --- 20 June 1863
Wisconsin Wisconsin (2) "f/a" 3 July 1836 29 May 1848
Wyoming Wyoming (5b), (5c), (8b), (9), (10) 25 July 1868 10 July 1890

Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Panama Canal Zone, and the Virgin Islands are noted later.  Various small island possessions are not described here, notably Palmyra, Wake, Midway, and Navassa.  Likewise, the territorial waters ("3-mile limit"), and ownership of the river forming a boundary (usually split down the middle).

Provisional or extralegal states and territories, not recognized by the Federal Government, include Franklin or Frankland (1784-89) in the vicinity of Tennessee; Deseret (1849-51) in the vicinity of Utah; Jefferson (1859-61), in the vicinity of Colorado; and several smaller units not described here.  More recent attempts at statehood include Sequoyah (1905), now part of Oklahoma; Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia (both continuing).

To avoid confusion, two important points:  Reference to "the territory of the United States, south of the river Ohio" does not imply that all lands between the Ohio River and Spanish Florida, and between the Atlantic-coast states and the Mississippi River, were included in this territory; it refers only to the land ceded by North Carolina, which became Tennessee.  Reference to "the territory of the United States, south of the State of Tennessee" does not imply that there was an actual legally-constituted territory by this name; generally, it refers to lands ceded by Britain, Spain, Georgia, and South Carolina, which became Mississippi Territory.

The US administrations in Cuba (1898-1902) and the Philippines (1898-1946) are generally not noted, though they did offer postal services.
Article I, Section 8, Clause 7, The Congress shall have Power ... To establish Post Offices and post roads.
Post Office Department and Postmasters General Highlights and Lowlights, a very short and very subjective list



Headings and links in the tables
Search suggestions
Geographic notes
Governmental notes
Bibliographic notes



[top; volume 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, etc.]
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US Statutes at Large, Volume 1, 1789-1799, published 1845, 1845 (with more material), 1848 (second ed.), 1850, 1854, 1861

This volume contains acts of the First through Fifth Congresses.  The first two sessions were held in New York, the remainder in Philadelphia.  The Constitution had been signed 17 Sep. 1787, by delegates from 12 of the 13 states; it went into effect with the first Congress, 4 Mar. 1789.  Ratification dates for the first 13 states, and statehood acts for Vermont, Kentucky, and Tennessee, are listed below.  The Northwest, Southwest, and Mississippi Territories were established, 1789, 1790, and 1798.

The Post Office was formally established on 18 Oct. 1782, under the Continental Congress.  The earliest postal acts under the Constitution continued and strengthened policies developed under the Continental Congress and the Articles of Confederation.
Public Acts and Resolutions in vol. 1, Private Acts and Resolutions in vol. 6.
Congress special sessions regular sessions Public Private Profiles
1st -- 4 Mar. 1789 – 29 Sep. 1789
4 Jan. 1790 – 12 Aug. 1790
6 Dec. 1790 – 3 Mar. 1791
p. 23-98
p. 99-187
p. 188-225
p. 1
p. 2-5
---
1st
2nd 4 Mar. 1791 24 Oct. 1791 – 8 May 1792
5 Nov. 1792 – 2 Mar. 1793
p. 226-286
p. 287-340
p. 6-10
p. 11-12
2nd
3rd 4 Mar. 1793 2 Dec. 1793 – 9 June 1794
3 Nov. 1794 – 3 Mar. 1795
p. 341-402
p. 403-444
p. 13-17
p. 18-21
3rd
4th 8 – 26 June 1795 7 Dec. 1795 – 1 June 1796
5 Dec. 1796 – 3 Mar. 1797
p. 445-495
p. 496-519
p. 22-28
p. 29-30
4th
5th 4 Mar. 1797

17 – 19 July 1798
15 May 1797 – 10 July 1797
13 Nov. 1797 – 16 July 1798
3 Dec. 1798 – 3 Mar. 1799
p. 520-535
p. 536-612
p. 613-756
---
p. 31-36
p. 37-38
5th
House Journal, Senate Journal, Senate Executive Journal, Annals of Congress
    House Journal, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3; 2/1, 2/2; 3/1, 3/2; 4/1, 4/2; 5/1, 5/2, 5/3
    House Journal, reprinted 1977, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3; 2/1, 2/2; 3/1, 3/2; 4/1, 4/2; 5/1, 5/2, 5/3
    House Journal, reprinted 1826, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3; 2/1, 2/2; 3/1, 3/2; 4/1, 4/2; 5/1, 5/2, 5/3
    Senate Journal, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3; 2/1, 2/2; 3/1, 3/2; 4/1, 4/2; 5/1, 5/2, 5/3
    Senate Journal, reprinted 1977, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3; 2/1, 2/2; 3/1, 3/2; 4/1, 4/2; 5/1, 5/2, 5/3
    Senate Executive Journal, vol. 1, 1/1, 1/2, 1/3; 2/sp, 2/1, 2/2; 3/sp, 3/1, 3/2; 4/sp, 4/1, 4/2; 5/sp, 5/1, 5/2, 5/sp, 5/3
    The Senate met entirely in closed session 4 Mar. 1789 to 3 Nov. 1794 (link).  The legislative debates are thus not recorded.
As 3 Mar. 1793 was a Sunday, the House and Senate adjourned the previous day.
3 Mar. 1799 was a Sunday; the House and Senate met that day and adjourned.
1845
1845 (but probably 1847), adding subject-matter tables 1848
1848 (second ed.)
1850 1854
1861, noted by Checklist of United States Public Documents, 1911, p. 966 (ref)
Accumulated from the editions of 1845 and (1847), PDF
Documentary History of the First Federal Congress, print and digital editions, 22 vol., 1972-2017
  1. Senate Legislative Journal
  2. Senate Executive Journal and Related Documents
  3. House of Representatives Journal
  4. Legislative Histories: Amendments to the Constitution through Foreign Officers Bill [HR-116]
  5. Legislative Histories: Funding Act [HR-63] through Militia Bill [HR-112]
  6. Legislative Histories: Mitigation of Fines Bill [HR-38] through Resolution on Unclaimed Western Lands
  7. Petition Histories: Revolutionary War-Related Claims
  8. Petition Histories and Nonlegislative Official Documents
  9. The Diary of William Maclay and Other Notes on Senate Debates
  10. Debates in the House of Representatives: First Session, April–May 1789
  11. Debates in the House of Representatives: First Session, June–September 1789
  12. Debates in the House of Representatives: Second Session, January–March 1790
  13. Debates in the House of Representatives: Second Session, April–August 1790
  14. Debates in the House of Representatives: Third Session, December 1790–March 1791
  15. Correspondence: First Session, March–May 1789
  16. Correspondence: First Session, June–August 1789
  17. Correspondence: First Session, September–November 1789
  18. Correspondence: Second Session, October 1789 – 14 March 1790
  19. Correspondence: Second Session, 15 March – June 1790
  20. Correspondence: Second Session, July–October 1790
  21. Correspondence: Third Session, November 1790 – March 1791
  22. Correspondence: Supplement


Public Acts and Resolutions, vol. 1, p. 1-756
Vol. Pages C/S Ch. Act of ... Title
--
--
--
--
Dec. 1660
An Act for Erecting and Establishing a Post Office.
Post Office Act 1660, 12 Charles II c.35 (link).
Transcribed, https://www.gbps.org.uk/...
--
--
--
--
25 Nov. 1710
16 May 1711
An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty's Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War and other Her Majesty's Occasions.
Post Office (Revenues) Act 1710, 9 Anne c.10 (link).
Transcribed, https://www.gbps.org.uk/...
--
--
--
--
10 Oct. 1765
An act to alter certain Rates of Postage, and to amend, explain, and enlarge several Provisions in an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, and in other Acts relating to the Revenue of the Post Office.
Postage Act 1765, 5 George III c.25 (link).
Transcribed, https://www.gbps.org.uk/...

Note.  The three links above are to Pickering's edition of the Statutes, formerly in the library of Matthew Davenport Hill, older brother of Rowland Hill.
-- -- -- -- 16 Dec. 1773 Wikipedia, Boston Tea Party.
-- -- -- -- 1774 Wikipedia, Intolerable Acts, enacted by Britain 31 Mar. 1774 to 22 June 1774, in reaction to events in Boston.
-- -- -- -- 1774 Wikipedia, Continental Congress, First Continental Congress (5 Sep. 1774 - 26 Oct. 1774).

Commemorative postage stamps -- First Continental Congress, 4 July 1974 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM; NPMA; MSC, MSC, MSC, MSC, MSC).
-- -- -- -- 14 Oct. 1774 Wikipedia, Declaration and Resolves of the First Continental Congress.
Journals, vol. 1, p. 63-73.
-- -- -- -- 1775-1781 Wikipedia, Second Continental Congress (10 May 1775 - 1 Mar. 1781).

The Continental Army was organized 14-16 June 1775, with George Washington in command (ref).  The Continental Navy, initiated 13 Oct. 1775 (ref), and Marines, initiated 10 Nov. 1775 (ref), were disbanded in 1783 and restarted in 1798.

Declaration Setting Forth the Causes and Necessities of Taking Up Arms, 6 July 1775.
Journals, vol. 2, p. 127-157.

Wikipedia, Continental Army, Continental Navy, Continental Marines.
-- -- -- -- 29 May 1775 "As the present critical situation of the colonies renders it highly necessary that ways and means should be devised for the speedy and secure conveyance of Intelligence from one end of the Continent to the other, Resolved, That Mr. [Benjamin] Franklin, Mr. [Thomas] Lynch, Mr. [Richard Henry] Lee, Mr. [Thomas] Willing, Mr. S[amuel] Adams, and Mr. P[hilip] Livingston, be a committee to consider the best means of establishing posts for conveying letters and intelligence through this continent."
Journals, vol. 2, p. 71.
-- -- -- -- 26 July 1775 Committee report delivered 25 July 1775, approved 26 July 1775.  Benjamin Franklin was thus appointed Postmaster General for the United Colonies.
Journals, vol. 2, p. 203, p. 208-209.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Post Office bicentennial, 3 Sep. 1975 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM; NPMA, MSC); Benjamin Franklin, Postmaster, 1 June 1976 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 7 Apr. 2006 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM; NPMA; MSC, MSC, MSC, MSC).
-- -- -- -- 30 Sep. 1775
17 Oct. 1777
16 Apr. 1779
28 Dec. 1779
5 May 1780
12 Dec. 1780
24 Feb. 1781
19 Oct. 1781
(1) Continental Congress, reintroducing the postage rates of 1765 (ref).
(2) Resolution, postage rates raised 50% (ref).
(3) Resolution, postage rates doubled (ref).
(4) Resolution, postage rates raised 20-fold over 1775 (ref).
(5) Resolution, postage rates doubled (ref).
(6) Resolution, postage rates reduced to 50% of the prewar rates (ref).
(7) Resolution, postage rates reduced to double the 1775 rates (ref).
(8) Resolution, postage rates reduced to the 1775 rates, etc. (ref).
-- -- -- -- 8 Nov. 1775 Franking privilege granted to delegates to the Continental Congress, "the members having engaged upon their honour not to frank or enclose any letters but their own".
Journals, vol. 3, p. 342.
-- -- -- -- 9 Jan. 1776 Resolution, "That no postage be paid for any letters to or from private soldiers, while engaged in actual service in the defence of the United Colonies ...".
Journals, vol. 4, p. 43.
-- -- -- -- 10 Jan. 1776 Thomas Paine, Common Sense, published anonymously in Philadelphia.
Second ed., 1776 (link), from the John Adams library.  Sixth ed., 1776 (link).
Wikipedia, Common Sense.
1
18.1
1-3
3-6
--
--
--
--
4 July 1776 Declaration of Independence.  No mention of the Post Office, but perhaps we can infer philately from "the pursuit of happiness".

Vote for independence, 2 July 1776; Journals, vol. 5, p. 506-507.
Declaration, 4 July 1776; Journals, vol. 5, p. 510-516.
An early printed version, 1777, by Mary Katharine Goddard, Baltimore, postmaster.
Commemorative postage stamps -- Signing the Declaration, 19 Mar. 1869 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, USPCS, WC); Sesquicentennial Exposition, 10 May 1926 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC); signing, 29 May 1976 (NPM, NPMA, MSC), 4 July 1976 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM; NPMA; MSC, MSC, MSC, MSC, WC).
Commemorative stamped envelope -- Sesquicentennial Exposition, 27 July 1926 (MSC, WC).
--
--
--
--
8 July 1776
8 Aug. 1776
(1) "Resolved, That the post masters, while in office, be excused from all military duty."
(2) "Resolved, That the post riders be exempted from military duty."
Journals, vol. 5, p. 526, p. 638.
-- -- -- -- 12 May 1777 "Resolved, That all post masters, post riders, and persons immediately concerned in conducting the business of the post office, ought to be exempted from all military duties; and that it be recommended to the legislatures of the different states, to exempt such persons accordingly."
Journals, vol. 7, p. 347.
Broadside, 1777, https://www.loc.gov/item/90898031/  [LOC]
By the Act of 20 Feb. 1792, 1 Stat. 232, § 27, it is a requirement.
-- -- -- -- 14 June 1777 The flag design was approved.  Journals, vol. 8, p. 464.
--
--
--
--
17 Oct. 1777
Postmaster General authorized to appoint additional surveyors of the post office, and an inspector of dead letters.
Journals, vol. 9, p. 811, p. 816-817.
1
18.1
4-9
7-12
--
--
--
--
15 Nov. 1777 Articles of Confederation, approved by the Second Continental Congress (ref), signed by most delegates 9 July 1778; fully effective 1 Mar. 1781.
Dates of ratification by each state, and signing by their delegates (if other than 9 July 1778).
    Virginia, 15 Dec. 1777.
    South Carolina, 5 Feb. 1778.
    New York, 6 Feb. 1778.
    Connecticut, 12 Feb. 1778.
    Rhode Island, 18 Feb. 1778.
    Georgia, 26 Feb. 1778; 24 July 1778.
    New Hampshire, 4 Mar. 1778; 9 July 1778 and 8 Aug. 1778.
    Pennsylvania, 5 Mar. 1778; 9 July 1778 and 22 July 1778.
    Massachusetts, 10 Mar. 1778.
    North Carolina, 25 Apr. 1778; 21 July 1778.
    New Jersey, 20 Nov. 1778; 26 Nov. 1778.
    Delaware, 1 Feb. 1779; 22 Feb. 1779 and 5 May 1779.
    Maryland, 2 Feb. 1781; 1 Mar. 1781.
Journals, vol. 9, p. 907-925; vol. 11, p. 661-670, p. 676-678, p. 709, p. 716; vol. 12, p. 1161-1164; vol. 13, p. 186-188, p. 236; vol. 14, p. 548; vol. 19, p. 138-140, p. 208-223.
An early printed version, 1777, https://www.loc.gov/resource/bdsdcc.n001001/  [LOC]

Art. 11 allowed for Canada to join the confederation.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Drafting the Articles, 30 Sep. 1977 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC).
1 4-9 -- -- 9 July 1778 Articles of Confederation, Art. 9, Sec. 4, "The United States, in Congress assembled, shall also have the sole and exclusive right and power of ... establishing and regulating post offices from one State to another, throughout all the United States, and exacting such postage on the papers passing through the same, as may be requisite to defray the expenses of the said office; ...".
18.1 7-12 -- -- 9 July 1778 Articles of Confederation, Art. 9, p. 10, "The United States in Congress assembled shall also have the sole and exclusive right and power of ... establishing and regulating post-offices from one State to another, throughout all the United States, and exacting such postage on the papers passing thro' the same as may be requisite to defray the expenses of the said office ... ".
-- -- -- -- 1781-1789 Wikipedia, Congress of the Confederation, United States in Congress Assembled (1 Mar. 1781 - 4 Mar. 1789).

Departments of Foreign Affairs (10 Jan. 1781), Finance, War, Marine (7 Feb. 1781).
Bank of North America, approved 26 May 1781, chartered 31 Dec. 1781, opened 7 Jan. 1782.
Journals, vol. 19, p. 42-44, p. 126-128; vol. 20, p. 545-548; vol. 21, p. 1186-1190.
Wikipedia, Bank of North America.
--
--
--
--
5 May 1780
Requirements of masters of packets and other vessels, to deposit letters upon arrival.
Journals, vol. 16, p. 413.
-- -- -- -- 20 June 1782 Great Seal of the United States, approved by Congress.
Journals, vol. 22, p. 338-340.

Wikipedia, Great Seal of the United States.
US State Dept., The Great Seal of the United States, 2003 (PDF).

Commemorative stamped envelope -- 15 June 1982 (MSC).
-- -- -- -- 18 Oct. 1782 An Ordinance for regulating the Post-Office of the United States of America.  Postage rates for letters and packets, in pennyweights and grains of silver; free franking, etc.
Journals, vol. 23, p. 669-679.  Amended, 28 Oct. 1782, p. 687-689; 24 Dec. 1782, p. 830.
Way and Gideon edition, 1823, vol. 4, p. 93-95, p. 125.

George Washington to Ebenezer Hazard, 18 May 1784, concerning his franking privilege, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/04-01-02-0264
--
--
--
--
28 Feb. 1783 Resolution, free franking.  Journals, vol. 24, p. 156-157.
8 80-83 -- -- 3 Sep. 1783 Treaty of Paris.
Provisional Articles, 30 Nov. 1782, 8 Stat. 54; Separate Article, Florida boundary, 30 Nov. 1782, 8 Stat. 57.
Armistice, 20 Jan. 1783, 8 Stat. 58.  Ratifications exchanged 12 May 1784.

Britain recognized US independence; this formally ended the British Post Office in America.  The national boundaries were set at the north through the Great Lakes, west to the Mississippi River, and south to Spanish Florida.

Wikipedia, Treaty of Paris (1783).  Transcriptions, Wikisource, Avalon Project.
--
--
--
--
24 Dec. 1783
Resolution, extra posts.  Journals, vol. 25, p. 839.
-- -- -- -- 1 Mar. 1784 Ordinance of 1784, following Virginia's conveyance of territory to the United States.  Largely written by Thomas Jefferson, it was a predecessor to the Northwest Ordinance of 13 July 1787.  A plan for surveying and selling land in the territory was approved 20 May 1785.
Journals, vol. 26, p. 112-120; vol. 28, p. 375-386,
--
--
--
--
30 June 1785
12 July 1785
7 Sep. 1785
Resolutions, mail contracts; inspection of the mails.  Journals, vol. 28, p. 489; vol. 29, p. 525-529, p. 684-685.
-- -- -- -- 7 Sep. 1785 Resolution, inspection of letters.
Secret Journals of the Acts and Proceedings of Congress, vol. 1, p. 266.
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--
--
--
21 June 1786
20 Sep. 1786
(1) Resolution, postmasters not to receive the paper money of any state for postage of letters.
(2) Resolution, postmasters to receive no other money than specie, in payment of postage.
Journals, vol. 30, p. 346; vol. 31, p. 674.
-- -- -- -- 14 Feb. 1787 [Draft] An Ordinance for regulating the Post Office of the United States of America.
Journals, vol. 32, p. 45-56.  Revision of the 18 Oct. 1782 Ordinance; discussion continued into 1788, but never acted upon.
Broadside version, https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.21300300/ [LOC] (implausibly dated as 1790).
-- -- -- -- May 1787 Constitutional Convention, Philadelphia, 25 May to 17 Sep. 1787.
Wikipedia, Constitutional Convention (United States).

Commemorative postal card -- Constitutional Convention, 25 May 1987 (MSC).
18.1 13-16 -- -- 13 July 1787 An Ordinance for the government of the territory of the United States northwest of the river Ohio.
Northwest Territory.  Bounded on the west by the Mississippi River, on the south by the Ohio River, on the east by the Pennsylvania border, and on the north by the Great Lakes and overland to the Lake of the Woods.  Art. V outlines potential state boundaries; later, these became Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota east of the Mississippi.  Art. VI outlawed slavery, but fugitive slaves were to be returned.
Journals, vol. 32, p. 334-343.
Renewed under the Constitution, 7 Aug. 1789, 1 Stat. 50.

Britain added the territory to the Province of Quebec by the Act of 22 June 1774 (ref, 14 Geo. III c. 83), one of the Intolerable Acts precipitating the Revolution.  Virginia claimed all of the territory north and west of the Ohio River, based on its 1609 charter, and extended its governance and military to parts of it in 1778 (ref) [see note below].  Massachusetts and Connecticut had competing claims, based on their "sea to sea" colonial charters.  New York had further claims from Iroquois lands.  British troops did not complete their withdrawal until 1796, under the Jay Treaty of 1794.

Maryland's delay in signing the Articles was intended to force other states to give up their claims to western lands (ref, ref, ref).  This was done by New York, 1 Mar. 1781 (ref); by Virginia, 1 Mar. 1784 (ref), confirmed 30 Dec. 1788 (ref); by Massachusetts, 19 Apr. 1785 (ref); and by Connecticut, 14 Sep. 1786 (ref, ref), though the Western Reserve claim continued to 30 May 1800 (ref, and 2 Stat. 56).

Further claims were vacated by Massachusetts, 16 Dec. 1786 (ref), within New York State; by South Carolina, 9 Aug. 1787 (ref, ref), though this later proved to be void due to "inadequate geographic information" (ref, ref, ref); by North Carolina, in a long process ending 2 Apr. 1790 (to Southwest Territory, later Tennessee); and by Georgia, 24 Apr. 1802 (to Mississippi Territory).

[note] In its 1776 constitution, Virginia gave up its colonial claims conflicting with those of Maryland, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and South Carolina (ref).  This did not affect Virginia's claim to the Northwest Territory; for that, see 1 Mar. 1784, above.  Virginia reserved a large ill-defined tract of land to compensate its military officers and soldiers; see Acts of 10 Aug. 1790, 1 Stat. 182; 23 Mar. 1804, 2 Stat. 274; 26 June 1812, 2 Stat. 764; etc.

Map, Historical diagram of Virginia [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Northwest Ordinance, Northwest Territory, Virginia Military District, United States Military District, Connecticut Western Reserve, State Cessions.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Northwest Ordinance, 13 July 1937 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC); Northwest Territory [first settlement], 15 July 1938 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC).
1 10-20 -- -- 17 Sep. 1787 Constitution, Art. I, Sec. 8, p. 12-14, "The Congress shall have power ... To establish post-offices and post-roads; ... And, To make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers, ...".
18.1 17-28 -- -- 17 Sep. 1787 Constitution, Art. I, Sec. 8, p. 19-21, "The Congress shall have Power ...  To establish Post Offices and post Roads; ... And To make all Laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into Execution the foregoing Powers, ...".
-- -- -- -- 17 Sep. 1787 Constitution, with Amendments 1 through 19, British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 120 (1924), p. 957-979.
-- -- -- -- 20 Oct. 1787 Postage rates were reduced 25% by resolution of 20 Oct. 1787, effective 5 Apr. 1788, based on a proposal of 13 Mar. 1787.  This was the last postal action of the Continental Congress.  The rates remained in effect until 1 June 1792 by the Act of 20 Feb. 1792.
Journals, vol. 32, p. 116; vol. 33, p. 694-695.
Way and Gideon edition, 1823, vol. 4, p. 801.

Note the statement of the PMG on 13 Mar. 1787, "That, should the Rates be reduced, he thinks it probable an Increase of Correspondence will prevent a Diminution of the Revenue."  Rowland Hill used the same argument in Britain in 1837, leading to the British penny postage.
Ratification of the Constitution Delaware, 7 Dec. 1787.
Pennsylvania, 12 Dec. 1787.
New Jersey, 18 Dec. 1787.
Georgia, 2 Jan. 1788.
Connecticut, 9 Jan. 1788.
Massachusetts, 6 Feb. 1788.
Maryland, 28 Apr. 1788.
South Carolina, 23 May 1788.
New Hampshire, 21 June 1788.
Virginia, 26 June 1788.
New York, 26 July 1788.
By Art. VII, the Constitution became effective with the ninth ratification (New Hampshire).

Commemorative postage stamps -- Drafting, Signing, Ratifying the Constitution, 17 Sep. 1937 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 21 June 1938 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 28 Aug. 1987 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC), 17 Sep. 1987 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
Commemorative postage stamps -- Bicentennial Statehood series, 1987-1988, Delaware, 4 July 1987 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Pennsylvania, 26 Aug. 1987 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); New Jersey, 11 Sep. 1987 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Georgia, 6 Jan. 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Connecticut, 9 Jan. 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Massachusetts, 6 Feb. 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Maryland, 15 Feb. 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); South Carolina, 23 May 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); New Hampshire, 21 June 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Virginia, 25 June 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); New York, 26 July 1988 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
-- -- -- -- 21 Jan. 1788 Final session of the Continental Congress, with the last day of business 10 Oct. 1788, formally ending 2 Mar. 1789.  The Constitution was declared to be ratified, 13 Sep. 1778.
Journals, vol. 34, p. 1, p. 518-523, p. 599, p. 605.
-- -- -- -- 4 Mar. 1789 First session of the Congress under the Constitution.  The date had been set as the first Wednesday in March by the Continental Congress, 13 Sep. 1788 (ref).  The House first reached a quorum on 1 Apr. 1789, and then elected a Speaker.  The Senate first reached a quorum on 6 Apr. 1789, and then elected a President (of the Senate) to count the votes of the electors for President and Vice-President of the United States.  The first act was approved 1 June 1789 (oath of office).
Wikipedia, Constitution of the United States, United States Congress.

Commemorative postage stamps -- House of Representatives, 4 Apr. 1989 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Senate, 6 Apr. 1989 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Executive Branch, 16 Apr. 1989 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Supreme Court, 2 Feb. 1990 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Inauguration of Pres. George Washington, 30 Apr. 1939 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC, WC).
1 50-53 1/1 8 7 Aug. 1789 An Act to provide for the Government of the Territory Northwest of the river Ohio.  The 1787 Northwest Territory Ordinance is included as a footnote.

Ohio statehood, 1 Mar. 1803, 2 Stat. 173, 2 Stat. 201.
1 65-67 1/1 12 2 Sep. 1789 An Act to establish the Treasury Department.  Duties of the Secretary, Comptroller, Auditor, etc.  Alterations not involving the Post Office are not noted here.

FRASER, An Act to Establish the Treasury Department, PDF.
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9 Sep. 1789
"The House then proceeded to consider the report of the committee, to whom was referred a letter from the Postmaster-General, which lies on the table:  Whereupon, Resolved, That until further provision be made by law, the General Post-Office of the United States shall be conducted according to the rules and regulations prescribed by the ordinances and resolutions of the late Congress and that contracts be made for the conveyance of the mail in conformity thereto."  Annals of Congress, vol. 1, col. 921-923 (link).
1 67-68 1/1 13 11 Sep. 1789 An Act for establishing the Salaries of the Executive Officers of Government, with their Assistants and Clerks.  The Postmaster General is not mentioned, except as a footnote referencing 2 Mar. 1827, 4 Stat. 239.
1 68-69 1/1 14 15 Sep. 1789 An Act to provide for the safe-keeping of the Acts, Records and Seal of the United States, and for other purposes.  Dept. of Foreign Affairs renamed Dept. of State, § 1.  Laws to be published in public newspapers, § 2.
1 70 1/1 16 22 Sep. 1789 An Act for the temporary establishment of the Post-Office.  Until the end of the next session of Congress [12 Aug. 1790]; extended by Act of 4 Aug. 1790, 1 Stat. 178.

Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W17355
Introduced in the Senate, 11 Sep. 1789; passed the Senate, 15 Sep. 1789; passed the House, 17 Sep. 1789.
The Osborne edition of the Acts (1790, link) and the Childs and Swaine editions (1791, link, link) give the approval date 18 Sep. 1789.  The Brown edition (1791) and all since give the date 22 Sep. 1789 (link), which is correct (link).  The Folwell edition (1796) omits the text, as the act had expired.
Notes, Post Office Dept. acts, p. 70.

For comparison, see the acts establishing the State Dept. [Dept. of Foreign Affairs], 27 July 1789 (p. 28-29) and 15 Sep. 1789 (p. 68-69); the War Dept., 7 Aug. 1789 (p. 49-50); the Treasury Dept., 2 Sep. 1789 (p. 65-67); the Judiciary and the office of the Attorney General, 24 Sep. 1789 (p. 73-93).  Some further notes are at 1 Stat. 279.

The first cabinet officers and their confirmation dates, were:
Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, 11 Sep. 1789; Secretary of War, Henry Knox, 12 Sep. 1789; Secretary of State, Thomas Jefferson, 26 Sep. 1789; Attorney General, Edmund Randolph, 26 Sep. 1789; Postmaster General, Samuel Osgood, 26 Sep. 1789.
Ratification of the Constitution North Carolina, 21 Nov. 1789; previously considered, 2 Aug. 1788.
    See also, Acts of 8 Feb. 1790, p. 99; 4 June 1790, p. 126a.
Rhode Island, 29 May 1790; previously rejected, 24 Mar. 1788.
    See also, Acts of 14 June 1790, p. 126c; 23 June 1790, p. 128; 5 July 1790, p. 129a.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Bicentennial Statehood series, 1989-1990,
North Carolina, 22 Aug. 1989 (NPM, NPMA, MSC);
Rhode Island, 29 May 1990 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
1 97-98 1/1 -- 25 Sep. 1789 Joint Resolution, proposing twelve amendments to the Constitution.  Ratification of ten of these (the Bill of Rights) was completed 15 Dec. 1791 (ref); Massachusetts, Georgia, and Connecticut ratified in 1939.

Documentary History of the Constitution, vol. 2, p. 321-390 (link).
House Manual, Amendment I, Amendment II, Amendment III, Amendment IV, Amendment V, Amendment VI, Amendment VII, Amendment VIII, Amendment IX, Amendment X (PDFs).
Constitution Annotated, First through Tenth Amendments (PDF), First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Ninth, Tenth (PDFs).
Wikipedia, United States Bill of Rights.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Bill of Rights, 1 July 1966 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 25 Sep. 1989 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
See also, Twenty-Seventh Amendment, 18 May 1992, 106 Stat. 5145.
1
95
1/1
23
29 Sep. 1789
An Act making Appropriations for the Service of the present year.  The first annual appropriation act, $639,000 in total.
1 101-103 1/2 2 1 Mar. 1790 An Act providing for the enumeration of the Inhabitants of the United States.  The first Federal Census, conducted by the marshals of the judicial districts.  The temporary central office, created for each census, was made permanent in 1903.

Additional, 5 July 1790, 1 Stat. 129a; 2 Mar. 1791, 1 Stat. 197; 8 Nov. 1791, 1 Stat. 226.
Apportionment, 25 Feb. 1791, 1 Stat. 191; 14 Apr. 1792, 1 Stat. 253.

Wikipedia, 1790 United States census.
US Census Bureau, 1790 Census, Overview, Publications.  The census reference date was 2 Aug. 1790.
Wikipedia, United States Census, United States Census Bureau.

Commemorative postal card -- Bureau of the Census, 21 Oct. 1965 (MSC).
1
1
106-109
123
1/2
1/2
6
14
2 Apr. 1790
26 May 1790
(1) An Act to accept a cession of the claims of the state of North Carolina to a certain district of Western territory.  North Carolina acts of Apr. 1784 session (ceded, ref, ref), Oct. 1784 session (previous act repealed over the "state" of Franklin, ref, ref), Nov. 1789 session (ceded, ref, ref, ref); deed of 25 Feb. 1790 (ref).
(2) An Act for the Government of the Territory of the United States, south of the river Ohio.  Southwest Territory, the extent of which was only the former North Carolina portion, later Tennessee.

Wikipedia, Southwest Territory.
Tennessee statehood, 1 June 1796, 1 Stat. 491.

Commemorative postage stamp -- see the Northwest Ordinance stamp, 13 July 1937 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), showing a map section "Terr. Southwest of the Ohio".

The cessions by the southern states to the United States were: from Virginia, 1 Mar. 1784, northwest of the Ohio River (while retaining Kentucky to 1 June 1792); from North Carolina, 25 Feb. 1790 (36° 30′ N to 35° N, which became Tennessee); from South Carolina, 9 Aug. 1787 (south from 35° N, about 12 miles, later proved to be vacuous); from Georgia, 24 Apr. 1802, south of the NC/SC claims to 31° N (part of which became Mississippi Territory in 1798, adding the rest in 1804); all west to the Mississippi River.
1 112-119 1/2 9 30 Apr. 1790 An Act for the Punishment of certain Crimes against the United States.  Counterfeiting public securities, § 14, p. 115.
1
11
1
--
2
2
2
130
751-752
214-215
--
55-56
103-108
195-197
1/2
--
1/3
--
6/1
6/2
7/1
28
--
17
--
37
15
53
16 July 1790
24 Jan. 1791
3 Mar. 1791
30 Mar. 1791
24 Apr. 1800
27 Feb. 1801
3 May 1802
(1) An Act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the Government of the United States.  Currently in New York, the capital would be in Philadelphia from 6 Dec. 1790, then Washington, D.C., from 1 Dec. 1800, § 5, 6.  Constitutional authority by Art. I, Sec. 8, Clause 17 (1 Stat. 14, 18.1 Stat. 21).
(2) Proclamation, Defining the Boundaries of the District of Columbia.
(3) An Act to amend "An act for establishing the temporary and permanent seat of the Government of the United States."  Location of the District.
(4) Proclamation, boundaries.
(5) An Act to make further provision for the removal and accommodation of the Government of the United States.  First provision for the Library of Congress, § 5.
(6) An Act concerning the District of Columbia.  The local government.  See also, Acts of 3 Mar. 1801, 2 Stat. 115; 3 May 1802, 2 Stat. 193.
(7) An Act to incorporate the inhabitants of the City of Washington, in the District of Columbia.  The local government.
See next, Act of 21 Feb. 1871, 16 Stat. 419; etc.

Land for the District of Columbia was ceded by Maryland (act of 23 Dec. 1788) and Virginia (act of 3 Dec. 1789).  For the 1846 retrocession of Alexandria to Virginia, see 9 Stat. 35 and 9 Stat. 1000.
Wikipedia, Residence Act, District of Columbia Organic Act of 1801.
Library of Congress, Residence Act.

Commemorative postage stamps -- National Capital Sesquicentennial, April-Nov. 1950 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM; NPMA; MSC, MSC, MSC, MSC); District of Columbia bicentennial, 7 Sep. 1991 (NPM, NPMA, MSC); Library of Congress, 24 Apr. 2000 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
1 145-178 1/2 35 4 Aug. 1790 An Act to provide more effectually for the collection of the duties imposed by law on goods, wares and merchandise imported into the United States, and on the tonnage of ships or vessels.  Exemptions from reporting ship's contents, § 17, p. 159.  Revenue cutters, § 62-65, p. 175.
1 178 1/2 36 4 Aug. 1790 An Act to continue in force for a limited time, an act intituled “An act for the temporary establishment of the Post-Office”.  Until the end of the next session of Congress [3 Mar. 1791]; extended by Act of 3 Mar. 1791, 1 Stat. 218.

original document, https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.2150020a/
original document, http://arago.si.edu/record_80912_img_1.html [archived]
Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W15507, http://estc.bl.uk/W15501
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W17666, http://estc.bl.uk/W17674
1 189 1/3 4 4 Feb. 1791 An Act declaring the consent of Congress, that a new State be formed within the jurisdiction of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and admitted into this Union, by the name of the State of Kentucky.  Effective 1 June 1792.

This followed the Virginia Act of 18 Dec. 1789 (ref, ref).  A federal district court for Kentucky, under Virginia, was already established, Act of 24 Sep. 1789, 1 Stat. 73.  A state district court was established effective 1 Aug. 1782 (ref).  Apportionment, 25 Feb. 1791, 1 Stat. 191.

Map, Historical diagram of Virginia [Van Zandt].

Commemorative postage stamps -- Kentucky statehood, 1 June 1942 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 1 June 1992 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
1
1
191
197-198
1/3
1/3
7
12
18 Feb. 1791
2 Mar. 1791
(1) An Act for the admission of the State of Vermont into this Union.  Effective 4 Mar. 1791.
(2) An Act giving effect to the laws of the United States within the state of Vermont.

Vermont, then known as the New Hampshire Grants, declared independence of Britain, New Hampshire and New York, 15 Jan. 1777 (ref, ref).  It was considered for statehood in Aug. 1781 (ref), but land grant disputes with New York prevailed until Mar. 1790.

Vermont employed a post rider in 1781 (ref), and operated five post offices, by act of 8 Mar. 1784 (ref).
Apportionment, 25 Feb. 1791, 1 Stat. 191.

Map, Historical diagram of New York [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Vermont Republic.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Vermont independence, 3 Aug. 1927 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC, WC); statehood, 4 Mar. 1941 (NPM, NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC, WC), 1 Mar. 1991 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
1
1
191-196
196-197
1/3
1/3
10
11
25 Feb. 1791
2 Mar. 1791
(1) An Act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States.  Chartered for 20 years.
(2) An Act supplementary to the act intituled "An Act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States".
Reopened in 1812 as Girard Bank, Philadelphia.

Wikipedia, First Bank of the United States.
A.P.C. Griffin, A List of Works relating to the First and Second Banks of the United States, Washington : Government Printing Office, 1908, https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001178849
1 218 1/3 23 3 Mar. 1791 An Act to continue in force for a limited time, an act intituled “An act for the temporary establishment of the Post-Office”.  Until the end of the next session of Congress [8 May 1792]; extended by Act of 20 Feb. 1792, 1 Stat. 232.  Free franking, § 2; the only mention of postage in the Acts of the First Congress.  Mail route, Albany (New York) to Bennington (Vermont), § 3.

original document, http://arago.si.edu/record_183916_img_1.html [archived]
https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1791Act.pdf
Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W17602
-- -- -- -- 22 Aug. 1791 Revolution begins in Haiti (Saint-Domingue, Santo Domingo, San Domingo), ending with independence from France in 1804.  Fear of a similar slave revolt in the US had an impact on some postal operations; see the Act of 3 May 1802, 2 Stat. 189, and notes on it.  Napoleon was also influenced to dispose of Louisiana in 1803.

Wikipedia, Haitian Revolution, Saint-Domingue.
1 229 2/1 4 3 Jan. 1792 An Act for carrying into effect a Contract between the United States and the State of Pennsylvania.  Sale of land to Pennsylvania, the Erie Triangle, previously claimed by Massachusetts and New York, ceded to the US in 1781.

Deed to the Erie Triangle, 3 Mar. 1792, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/05-10-02-0009.

Pennsylvania's eastern boundary at the Delaware River, and southern boundary at the Twelve-Mile Circle (1750, with Delaware) and Mason-Dixon line (1767, 39° 43′ N, with Maryland and Virginia), were long-established.  Virginia retained control of the Pittsburgh region until 1 Oct. 1780, ended by agreement of 31 Aug. 1779 (ref), setting the western boundary at 80° 31′ W.  Land disputes with Connecticut over the northern part of Pennsylvania, starting in 1771, ended in Pennsylvania's favor by arbitration 30 Dec. 1782 (ref, ref); this established the northern boundary of the state at 42° N.  The Erie Triangle purchase allowed access to Lake Erie.

Wikipedia, History of Pennsylvania, Mason-Dixon line, Twelve-Mile Circle, Erie Triangle.
1 232-239 2/1 7 20 Feb. 1792 An Act to establish the Post-Office and Post Roads within the United States.  Effective "from and after" 1 June 1792, § 1, 9.  Post roads, § 1; contracts, § 2, 6; postmaster general, § 3, 8; quarterly accounts, § 4; penalties, § 5, 11, 14-17, 24-25; post office hours, § 7; rates of postage, § 9-10 [now in dollars and cents]; robbing the mail (with notes), § 17; advertised letters, § 18; free franking, § 19-20; newspapers, § 21-22; compensation, § 23; ship letters, § 12-13, 26.  Authority for postal conventions, § 26.  Post Office employees exempt from militia duty, § 27.  Revenues previous to 1 June 1792, § 28.  Previous act [3 Mar. 1791] valid until 1 June 1792, § 29.  This act valid for a period of two years, from 1 June 1792, § 30.

Passed the House, 9 Jan. 1792; amended and passed the Senate, 30 Jan. 1792; amended by the House, 2 Feb. 1792; passed the Senate, 3 Feb. 1792.
Notes on court cases, p. 237.
original document, https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.rbc/rbpe.21800300
original document, https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.21800500
original document, https://hdl.loc.gov/loc.rbc/rbpe.2180050a
original document, http://arago.si.edu/record_76704_img_1.html [archived]
https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1792Act.pdf
Transcribed, with links to LoC, https://njpostalhistory.org/media/pdf/postact1792.pdf
Wikipedia, Postal Service Act
Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W17606, http://estc.bl.uk/W15502
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W17769, http://estc.bl.uk/W14838, http://estc.bl.uk/W15504
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W17777, http://estc.bl.uk/W15505

Message of the President to Congress, 6 Nov. 1792 (excerpt), "It is represented that some provisions in the law which establishes the post office, operate, in experiment, against the transmission of newspapers to distant parts of the country.  Should this, upon due inquiry, be found to be the fact, a full conviction of the importance of facilitating the circulation of political intelligence and information, will, I doubt not, lead to the application of a remedy."

"It was in February, 1792, in the course of a conference upon post-office affairs, that Jefferson disclosed to the President his intention to retire [as Secretary of State].  It was not yet clear whether the post-office belonged to the Department of State or to that of the Treasury, and Jefferson wished the question settled.  He told the President that, in his opinion, it belonged, and ought to belong, to the State Department, because, among other reasons, the Treasury Department was already too powerful, wielding “such an influence as to swallow up the whole executive powers”; so that “even the future Presidents, not supported by the weight of character which himself possessed, would not be able to make head against it.”  He disclaimed all personal interest in the matter.  ...  The President asked him to breakfast with him the next morning, in order that the subject might be resumed. They met accordingly, and when the post-office question had been duly considered, the President revived the topic of Jefferson’s intention to retire.".
James Parton, The Quarrel of Jefferson and Hamilton, The Atlantic, March 1873 (link).

Relevant to the postage rates, see Treasury Department Circular to the Collectors of the Customs, 23 July 1792, https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-12-02-0069.
1 239-241 2/1 8 1 Mar. 1792 An Act relative to the Election of a President and Vice President of the United States, and declaring the Officer who shall act as President in case of Vacancies in the offices both of President and Vice President.  Electoral College certificates to be sent by mail, § 2.  The term of office for the President and Vice President begins 4 March, § 12.
--
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28 Apr. 1792
A bill introduced in the Senate, "An Act for reducing the rates of postage on newspapers" (ref).  It was not further considered.
1
1
1
2
3
12
12
32
264-265
271-274
424-425
490-491
134-136
597-600
731-737
775-780
2/1
2/1
3/2
10/1
13/2
37/2
37/3
57/2
28
33
36
55
82
201
75
196
2 May 1792
8 May 1792
28 Feb. 1795
23 Apr. 1808
18 Apr. 1814
17 July 1862
3 Mar. 1863
21 Jan. 1903
(1) An Act to provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions.  The title is derived from the Constitution, Art. 1, § 8, giving Congress the power "To provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections and repel invasions."
(2) An Act more effectually to provide for the National Defence by establishing an Uniform Militia throughout the United States.  "Each and every free able-bodied white male citizen" between ages 18 and 45 to be enrolled, § 1.  Exempted from militia duty, "...; all post-officers, and stage drivers, who are employed in the care and conveyance of the mail of the post-office of the United States; all ferrymen employed at any ferry on the post road; ...", § 2.
(3) An Act to provide for calling forth the Militia to execute the laws of the Union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions; and to repeal the Act now in force for those purposes.  Replacing the 1792 acts; no mention of exemptions.
(4) An Act making provision for arming and equipping the whole body of the Militia of the United States.  Arms and armories.
(5) An Act in addition to the act, entitled "An act to provide for calling forth the militia to execute the laws of the union, suppress insurrections, and repel invasions, and to repeal the act now in force for those purposes.".  Amending the 1795 act; no postal impact.
(6) An Act to amend the Act calling forth the Militia to execute the Laws of the Union, suppress Insurrections, and repel Invasions, approved February twenty-eight, seventeen hundred and ninety-five, and the Acts amendatory thereof, and for other Purposes.  "All able-bodied male citizens between the ages of eighteen and forty-five ...".
(7) An Act for enrolling and calling out the national Forces, and for other purposes.  No mention of exemptions related to the Post Office.
(8) An Act To promote the efficiency of the militia, and for other purposes.  National Guard.  Exempted from militia duty, "..., postmasters and persons employed by the United States in the transmission of the mail, ferrymen employed at any ferry on a post road ...", § 2.

For additional militia acts, 1792-1821, see the notes on 1 Stat. 271 and 2 Stat. 490.

Wikipedia, Militia Acts of 1792, Militia Act of 1808, Militia Act of 1862, Enrollment Act (1862), Militia Act of 1903, National Guard.
1 279-281 2/1 37 8 May 1792 An Act making alterations in the Treasury and War Departments.  Free franking, § 12.
Commissioner of the Revenue, § 6; office discontinued, 6 Apr. 1802, 2 Stat. 148 § 2; reestablished, 24 July 1813, 3 Stat. 39; abolished, 23 Dec. 1817, 3 Stat. 401 § 2.
1 285-286 2/1 42 8 May 1792 An Act respecting the government of the territories of the United States northwest and south of the river Ohio.  Administrative issues only.
--
--
2/2
--
1793
Report on Newspaper Postage, Annals of Congress, vol. 3, col. 1322-1324 (link).  Also, post roads.
-- -- 2/2 -- 1793 Committee report.  ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W18010
1 302-305 2/2 7 12 Feb. 1793 An Act respecting fugitives from justice, and persons escaping from the service of their masters.
Modified by Act of 18 Sep. 1850, 9 Stat. 462.  Repealed in part, Act of 28 June 1864, 13 Stat. 200.

Wikipedia, Fugitive Slave Act of 1793.
1 341 3/1 1 13 Jan. 1794 An Act making an alteration in the Flag of the United States.
1 347-349 3/1 11 22 Mar. 1794 An Act to prohibit the carrying on the Slave Trade from the United States to any foreign place or country.
1 354-366 3/1 23 8 May 1794 An Act to establish the Post-office and Post-roads within the United States.  Effective "from and after" 1 June 1794, § 8; "from" 1 June 1794, § 29.  Post roads, § 1; contracts, § 2, 6; postmaster general, § 3, 8; quarterly accounts, § 4; penalties, § 5, 11, 14, 16-17, 24-25 [fines, imprisonment, or death]; post office hours, § 7; rates of postage, § 9-10; postal monopoly, § 14; way letters, § 15; advertised letters, Dead Letter Office, § 18; free franking, § 19-20; newspapers, § 21-22; compensation, § 23 [with extensive notes on court decisions]; ship letters, § 12-13, 26; letter carriers, carrier fees, drop letters, § 28.  Post Office employees exempt from militia duty, § 27.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1796, vol. 3, p. 36-59 (link).
https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1794Act.pdf
Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W15503, http://estc.bl.uk/W15506

Postmaster General Timothy Pickering was reconfirmed by the Senate, 11 Dec. 1794, under this act (link).  He was soon after nominated and confirmed as Secretary of War (link).
A report on the execution of the Postal Law was given in Dec. 1794 (link), and proposed revisions in April 1796 (link), Jan. 1799 (link), etc.
The effective date of 1 June 1794 was too soon for mail contracts to be concluded, so those were set for 1 Oct. 1794.

Notes, Decisions of the courts of the United States on the duties and obligations of the Postmaster General, Postmasters, and the Post Office, p. 363-365.
1 402 3/1 8 11 Mar. 1794 Joint Resolution, proposing the Eleventh Amendment to the Constitution.  Ratification was completed 7 Feb. 1795, and certified by Message of the President, 8 Jan. 1798 (ref, link).

Documentary History of the Constitution, vol. 2, p. 391-407 (link).
House Manual, Amendment XI (PDF).
Constitution Annotated, Eleventh Amendment (PDF).
Wikipedia, Eleventh Amendment to the United States Constitution.
1 403-404 3/2 2 3 Dec. 1794 An Act extending the privilege of franking to James White, the delegate from the Territory of the United States, south of the river Ohio; and making provision for his compensation.  Southwest Territory, later Tennessee.  White was the first non-voting delegate to Congress.
--
--
--
--
20 Jan. 1795
Postmaster General's Report, laid before the House.  Annals of Congress, vol. 2, col. 2161-2168 (link).
1 419 3/2 27 23 Feb. 1795 An Act to establish the Office of Purveyor of Public Supplies.  Free franking, § 1.
1 419-420 3/2 30 25 Feb. 1795 An Act to amend the act entitled “An act to establish the Post-Office and Post Roads within the United States”.  Changes to post roads.

Original document, https://www.loc.gov/item/rbpe.22200900/.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1796, vol. 3, p. 177-179 (link).
Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W14572
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
443
496
519
724-725
755
302-303
308
3/2
4/2
4/2
5/3
5/3
8/1
8/2
50
1
--
30
--
60
3
3 Mar. 1795
21 Dec. 1796
3 Mar. 1797
2 Mar. 1799
2 Mar. 1799
27 Mar. 1804
2 Jan. 1805
(1) An Act for the more general promulgation of the laws of the United States.  The Folwell edition.
(2) An Act to amend the act intituled "An act for the more general promulgation of the Laws of the United States."
(3) Resolution, Mode of distributing laws of the United States.
(4) An Act in addition to an act intituled "An Act for the more general promulgation of the laws of the United States.".  Publication in newspapers; increased printing and wider distribution.
(5) Resolution, A subscription to Folwell's edition of the Journals of Congress authorized.
(6) An Act to provide for a more extensive distribution of the Laws of the United States.
(7) An Act for the disposal of certain copies of the Laws of the United States.
1 464-469 4/1 29 18 May 1796 An Act providing for the Sale of the Lands of the United States, in the territory northwest of the river Ohio, and above the mouth of Kentucky river.  Navigable rivers declared public highways, § 9.
Similar, 1 June 1796, 1 Stat. 490, § 6.

These declarations applied only to the public lands to be sold.
1
1
2
469-474
743-749
139-147
4/1
5/3
7/1
30
46
13
19 May 1796
3 Mar. 1799
30 Mar. 1802
(1) An Act to regulate Trade and Intercourse with the Indian Tribes, and to preserve Peace on the Frontiers.
(2) An Act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers.  Extended, 17 Jan. 1800, 2 Stat. 6.  Supplementary act, 22 Apr, 1800, 2 Stat. 39.
(3) An Act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers.  Supplementary act, limiting trade to US citizens, 29 Apr. 1816, 3 Stat. 332.
Boundary lines between the United States and Indian country.

Earlier acts regulating trade did not define boundaries (22 July 1790, 1 Stat. 137; 1 Mar. 1793, 1 Stat. 329).  Trading houses established under the Act of 18 Apr. 1796, 1 Stat. 452, and its continuations, were abolished 6 May 1822, 3 Stat. 679.
See next, Act of 28 May 1830, 4 Stat. 411; 30 June 1834, 4 Stat. 729.
1 474-475 4/1 32 27 May 1796 An Act altering the Compensation of the Accountant of the War Department.  Free franking, § 2.
1
1
1
491-492
496-497
617-618
4/1
4/2
5/3
47
2
8
1 June 1796
31 Jan. 1797
19 Feb. 1799
(1) An Act for the admission of the State of Tennessee into the Union.   Former Southwest Territory.
(2) An Act giving effect to the Laws of the United States, within the State of Tennessee.
(3) An Act to amend an act entitled "An act giving effect to the Laws of the United States within the district of Tennessee".

Daniel Smith, A Short Description of the State of Tennassee, lately called The Territory of the United States, south of the river Ohio, to accompany and explain a map of that country, Philadelphia : Mathew Carey, 9 Mar. 1796 (link).

Commemorative postage stamps -- Tennessee statehood, 1 June 1946 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC, WC), 31 May 1996 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, MSC).
1 509-512 4/2 19 3 Mar. 1797 An Act in addition to the act intituled “An act to establish the Post-Office and Post Roads within the United States”.  Post roads and compensation, § 1-5, 8; newspapers, § 6; free franking for George Washington, § 9.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1796, vol. 3, p. 414-420 (link).
Wikisource, transcribed.
1796 Committee report, ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W21846
1796 bill, ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W14878
1 512-516 4/2 20 3 Mar. 1797 An Act to provide more effectually for the Settlement of Accounts between the United States, and Receivers of public Money.  Payments, § 5 (not specifically postal).
1 547 5/2 24 28 Mar. 1798 An Act to continue in force the fifth section of an act intituled “An Act in addition to the act intituled, An act to establish the Post-Office and Post Roads within the United States”.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 85 (link).
Wikisource, transcribed.
1
2
2
2
549-550
229-235
303-306
734
5/2
7/2
8/1
12/1
28
27
61
84
7 Apr. 1798
3 Mar. 1803
27 Mar. 1804
14 May 1812
(1) An Act for an amicable settlement of limits with the state of Georgia, and authorizing the establishment of a government in the Mississippi territory.  Between the mouth of the Yazoo River (at the Mississippi River) on the west and north, the Chattahoochee River on the east, and 31° N on the south; this was the part of West Florida added by Britain in 1764, though still disputed by Georgia.  Effective 7 May 1798, when the Governor was confirmed by the Senate (ref).  Spanish claims had been relinquished by the Treaty of 27 Oct. 1795, effective 3 Aug. 1796, 8 Stat. 138; Spanish troops were fully evacuated in 1797 (see 2 Stat. 229 § 2).
(2) An Act regulating the grants of land, and providing for the disposal of the lands of the United States, south of the state of Tennessee.  Settlement of British and Spanish land warrants.
(3) An Act supplementary to the act intituled "An act regulating the grants of land, and providing for the disposal of the lands of the United States, south of the state of Tennessee".  Mississippi Territory enlarged northward, now from Spanish Florida (31° N) to Tennessee (35° N), § 7, p. 305.  Cession by Georgia, 24 Apr. 1802 (ref); Georgia was to be paid $1,250,000 from future land sales by the US.  See also, Act of 2 Mar. 1805, 2 Stat. 323.
(4) An Act to enlarge the boundaries of the Mississippi territory.  Annexing part of West Florida, from the Pearl River to the Perdido River, south of 31° N.  This portion was still claimed and partly controlled by Spain, settled in favor of the US by force of arms in 1813 and by treaty in 1819.

See also, Act of 10 May 1800, 2 Stat. 69; Act of 9 Jan. 1808, 2 Stat. 455; Proclamation of 27 Oct. 1810, 11 Stat. 761; Act of 3 Mar. 1811, 6 Stat. 99b; Resolution of 17 June 1812, 2 Stat. 786; Act of 18 Apr. 1814, 6 Stat. 139a.
West Florida, Mississippi River to Pearl River, see Louisiana, Act of 14 Apr. 1812, 2 Stat. 708.
West Florida, Perdido River to Apalachicola River, remained in Spanish control.

Georgia had made large grants to land speculators in 1789 and 1795, from the Alabama and Coosa Rivers on the east, to the Mississippi on the west, and from 31° N to 35° N.  The 1789 grants were voided for non-payment, and the 1795 grants were rescinded in 1796.  The speculators sued, and Congress settled the accounts with the Act of 31 Mar. 1814, 3 Stat. 116, with supplements 3 Stat. 192, 3 Stat. 235, 3 Stat. 294.  [Paullin, p. 30-31, plate 45A]

Map, Historical diagram of Georgia, Mississippi [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Mississippi Territory, Pinckney's Treaty (1795), Yazoo land scandal.
Mississippi statehood, 10 Dec. 1817, 3 Stat. 348, 3 Stat. 472.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Mississippi Territory, showing a map of the expansion, 7 Apr. 1948 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC, WC).  See also, the Northwest Ordinance stamp, 13 July 1937 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), showing a map section "claimed by Spain until 1795".
1
1
553-554
569
5/2
5/2
35
56
30 Apr. 1798
22 June 1798
(1) An Act to establish an Executive department, to be denominated the Department of the Navy.  Previously part of the War Dept.
(2) An Act to extend the privilege of franking letters and packets to the Secretary of the Navy.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 140-141 (link).
Wikisource, transcribed.

Ships for the Navy were provided by the Act of 27 Mar. 1794, 1 Stat. 350, unless peace with Algiers was first established (it was not, until 1815).
The first Secretary of the Navy, Benjamin Stoddert, was confirmed 21 May 1798.
1 580-591 5/2 70 9 July 1798 An Act to provide for the valuation of Lands and Dwelling-Houses, and the enumeration of Slaves within the United States.  Free franking, § 28.  This enumeration was for tax purposes.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 168-191 (link).
1 591-594 5/2 71 11 July 1798 An Act to regulate and fix the compensation of the officers employed in collecting the internal revenues of the United States, and to insure more effectually the settlement of their accounts.  Free franking, § 11.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 191-198 (link).
1 594-596 5/2 72 11 July 1798 An Act for the establishing and organizing a Marine Corps.
1 610 5/2 85 16 July 1798 An Act to alter and amend the several acts for the establishment and regulation of the Treasury, War and Navy Departments.  Free franking, § 1.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 233-235 (link).
1 613 5/3 1 30 Jan. 1799 An Act for the punishment of certain Crimes therein specified.  Correspondence with foreign governments, by a private citizen, with the intent to influence government action.

Wikipedia, Logan Act.
1 627-704 5/3 22 2 Mar. 1799 An Act to regulate the collection of duties on imports and tonnage.  Exemptions from reporting ship's contents, § 31, p. 651.
1 709-717 5/3 24 2 Mar. 1799 An Act for the Government of the Navy of the United States.  Letters from the enemy, § 34-35, p. 712; similar clauses in later years for the Army or Navy are not listed here.
1 717-720 5/3 25 2 Mar. 1799 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government for the year one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 720.

The appropriations acts of 1789 through 1798 make no specific mention of the Post Office; see p. 95, 104, 185, 190, 226, 284, 325, 342, 394, 405, 445, 493, 498, 534, 536, 542, 611, 723.  The Act of 5 Feb. 1796, p. 446, provided rent for the building shared by the War Dept. and the General Post Office.
1 729-730 5/3 38 2 Mar. 1799 An act to augment the Salaries of the Officers therein mentioned.  Postmaster General, and Assistant, § 1.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 499 (link).
1 730-731 5/3 40 2 Mar. 1799 An Act to regulate and fix the Compensation of Clerks.  Postmaster General's office, § 2; the clerks were to be paid quarterly out of the revenues of the Post Office.
See next, 2 Stat. 396, 21 Apr. 1806.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 500-502 (link).
1 733-741 5/3 43 2 Mar. 1799 An Act to establish the Post-Office of the United States.  Effective 1 May 1799, § 31.  General Post Office and postmaster general, § 1; oath of office, § 2; penalties and suits, § 3, 9, 14-15, 20, 23-24, 28-29 [fines, whipping, imprisonment, or death]; contracts for carrying the mail, § 4; duties of postmasters, § 5, 6; rates of postage, § 7; ship letters, § 8, 10-11, 25; postal monopoly, § 12; way letters, § 13; advertised letters, dead letters, § 16; free franking, § 17-18; newspapers, § 19-20; compensation, § 21; quarterly accounts, § 22; letter carriers, carrier fees, drop letters, § 27; unproductive post roads, § 30; repeal of former acts, § 31.  Post Office employees exempt from militia duty and jury duty, § 26.

Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1799, vol. 4, p. 505-523 (link).
https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1799Act.pdf
Wikisource, transcribed.
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W15500
ESTC, http://estc.bl.uk/W15019
(Evans 36476, 36489)

For the oath of office taken by any elected or appointed officer of the United States, see Act of 1 June 1789, 1 Stat. 23, esp. § 4.
For a discussion of delivery from the post office to address, see Nathan Dane, A General Abridgement and Digest of American Law, Boston, 1824, vol. 2, p. 436-438 (link).
-- -- -- -- 1799 Connecticut finally relinquished all its claims to lands in Pennsylvania.

Map, Historical diagram of Pennsylvania [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Pennamite-Yankee War.
Founders Online, The Connecticut-Pennsylvania Territorial Dispute.
Connecticut History, The Susquehanna Settlers.
Connecticut State Library, Connecticut's Susquehanna Settlers.




[top; volume 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, etc.]
[previous, next]

US Statutes at Large, Volume 2, 1799-1813, published 1845, 1848, 1850, 1853, 1854, 1861

This volume contains acts of the Sixth through Twelfth Congresses.  The first session was held in Philadelphia, the remainder in Washington, D.C.

Ohio was admitted to the Union, 29 Nov. 1802 or 19 Feb. 1803 or 1 Mar. 1803, under the Acts of 30 Apr. 1802, 2 Stat. 173, and 19 Feb. 1803, 2 Stat. 201; the official date is now 1 Mar. 1803, since 7 Aug. 1953, 67 Stat. 407, Congress having neglected to complete the formal admission until then (some history).  The Indiana Territory (7 May 1800, effective "from and after" 4 July 1800, 2 Stat. 58) was expanded with the balance of the Northwest Territory, then divided forming Michigan Territory (11 Jan. 1805, effective "from and after" 30 June 1805, 2 Stat. 309) and Illinois Territory (3 Feb. 1809, effective "from and after" 1 Mar. 1809, 2 Stat. 514).

The Louisiana Purchase was concluded by treaty and two conventions, in Paris, 30 Apr. 1803, 8 Stat. 200, and the Act of 31 Oct. 1803, 2 Stat. 245.  The Territory of Orleans and the District of Louisiana were organized, 26 Mar. 1804, 2 Stat. 283.  The state of Louisiana (former Territory of Orleans) was admitted to the Union effective 30 Apr. 1812, 2 Stat. 701.  The balance of the Louisiana Territory (former District of Louisiana) was renamed the Missouri Territory, 4 June 1812, 2 Stat. 743.

The District of Columbia was organized from lands ceded by Maryland and Virginia (16 July 1790, 1 Stat. 130, see above); the ex-Virginia portion was returned in 1846, 9 Stat. 35.
Public Acts and Resolutions in vol. 2, Private Acts and Resolutions in vol. 6.
Congress special sessions regular sessions Public Private Profiles
6th -- 2 Dec. 1799 – 14 May 1800
17 Nov. 1800 – 3 Mar. 1801
p. 3-87
p. 88-127
p. 39-41
p. 42-44
6th
7th 4 – 5 Mar. 1801 7 Dec. 1801 – 3 May 1802
6 Dec. 1802 – 3 Mar. 1803
p. 128-198
p. 199-244
p. 45-48
p. 49-50
7th
8th -- 17 Oct. 1803 – 27 Mar. 1804
5 Nov. 1804 – 3 Mar. 1805
p. 245-306
p. 307-347
p. 51-55
p. 56-58
8th
9th 4 Mar. 1805 2 Dec. 1805 – 21 Apr. 1806
1 Dec. 1806 – 3 Mar. 1807
p. 348-410
p. 411-449
p. 59-62
p. 63-69
9th
10th -- 26 Oct. 1807 – 25 Apr. 1808
7 Nov. 1808 – 3 Mar. 1809
p. 450-504
p. 505-546
p. 70-78
p. 79-85
10th
11th 4 – 7 Mar. 1809 22 May 1809 – 28 June 1809
27 Nov. 1809 – 1 May 1810
3 Dec. 1810 – 3 Mar. 1811
p. 547-553
p. 554-613
p. 614-666
p. 86
p. 87-95
p. 96-102
11th
12th -- 4 Nov. 1811 – 6 July 1812
2 Nov. 1812 – 3 Mar. 1813
p. 667-786
p. 787-832
p. 103-115
p. 116-119
12th
House Journal, Senate Journal, Senate Executive Journal, Annals of Congress
    House Journal, 6/1, 6/2; 7/1, 7/2; 8/1, 8/2; 9/1, 9/2; 10/1, 10/2; 11/1, 11/2, 11/3; 12/1 pt 1, 12/1 pt 2, 12/2
    House Journal, reprinted 1977, 6/1, 6/2; 7/1, 7/2; 8/1, 8/2; 9/1, 9/2; 10/1, 10/2; 11/1, 11/2, 11/3; 12/1 pt 1, 12/1 pt 2, 12/2
    House Journal, reprinted 1826, 6/1, 6/2; 7/1, 7/2; 8/1, 8/2; 9/1, 9/2; 10/1, 10/2; 11/1, 11/2, 11/3; 12/1, 12/2
    Senate Journal, 6/1, 6/2; 7/1, 7/2; 8/1, 8/2; 9/1, 9/2; 10/1, 10/2; 11/1, 11/2, 11/3; 12/1, 12/2
    Senate Journal, reprinted 1977, 6/1, 6/2; 7/1, 7/2; 8/1, 8/2; 9/1, 9/2; 10/1, 10/2; 11/1, 11/2, 11/3; 12/1, 12/2
    Senate Executive Journal, vol. 1, 6/1, 6/2; 7/sp, 7/1, 7/2; 8/1, 8/2; 9/sp, vol. 2, 9/1, 9/2; 10/1, 10/2; 11/sp, 11/1, 11/2, 11/3; 12/1, 12/2
3 Mar. 1805 was a Sunday; the House and Senate met that day and adjourned.
3 Mar. 1811 was a Sunday; the House and Senate met that day and adjourned.
1845
1848, as 1845, p. i-xxxviii, 3-832 1850, as 1845, p. i-xxxviii, 3-832 1853, as 1845, p. i-xxxviii, 3-832
1854, 1861, noted by Checklist of United States Public Documents, 1911, p. 966 (ref)
Accumulated from the edition of 1845, PDF

Public Acts and Resolutions, vol. 2, p. 1-832

Vol. Pages C/S Ch. Act of ... Title
2 4 6/1 2 2 Jan. 1800 An Act extending the privilege of franking to William Henry Harrison, the delegate from the territory of the United States, northwest of the [river] Ohio; and making provision for his compensation.  Northwest Territory.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1803, vol. 5, p. 4-5 (link).
Wikisource, transcribed.
2 11-14 6/1 12 28 Feb. 1800 An Act providing for the second Census or enumeration of the Inhabitants of the United States.

Additional, 12 Apr. 1800, 2 Stat. 37.  Apportionment, 14 Jan. 1802, 2 Stat. 128.

Wikipedia, 1800 United States census.
US Census Bureau, 1800 Census, Overview, Publications.  The census reference date was 4 Aug. 1800.
2 19 6/1 18 3 Apr. 1800 An Act to extend the privilege of franking letters and packages to Martha Washington.  Widow of Pres. George Washington.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1803, vol. 5, p. 45 (link).
2 40-42 6/1 31 23 Apr. 1800 An Act to establish a general Stamp Office.  Stamped paper for revenue purposes.  Free franking, § 2.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1803, vol. 5, p. 95-100 (link).
2 42-45 6/1 32 23 Apr. 1800 An Act to alter and to establish sundry Post Roads.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1803, vol. 5, p. 101-107 (link).
2 56-57 6/1 38 28 Apr. 1800 An Act to authorize the President of the United States to accept, for the United States, a cession of jurisdiction of the territory west of Pennsylvania, commonly called the Western Reserve of Connecticut.  Between 41° N and 42° 02′ N, extending 120 miles west from the Pennsylvania boundary.

This was the balance of the Connecticut claim relinquished in 1786.  Offered by the Connecticut legislature, Oct. 1797; accepted by this act; confirmed by the legislature 30 May 1800.  Assigned to the Northwest Territory, later part of Ohio.

See also, Carter, Territorial Papers, vol. 2, p. 657-658 (ref); vol. 3, p. 84-86, footnote 40 (ref); vol. 3, p. 524 (ref).
Wikipedia, Connecticut Western Reserve.
2 58-59 6/1 41 7 May 1800 An act to divide the territory of the United States northwest of the [river] Ohio, into two separate governments.  Northwest Territory, Indiana Territory.  Divided along a line from the Ohio River opposite the Kentucky River, to Fort Recovery, then northward to the national boundary.  Effective "from and after" 4 July 1800.

Indiana Territory was increased with the balance of Northwest Territory after Ohio statehood (1803), and decreased by the formation of Michigan Territory (1805) and Illinois Territory (1809).  After Indiana statehood (1816), the balance of Indiana Territory was added to Michigan Territory (1818).

Map, Historical diagram of Indiana [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Indiana Territory.
Indiana statehood, 11 Dec. 1816, 3 Stat. 289, 3 Stat. 399.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Indiana Territory, 4 July 1950 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC).
2 62-66 6/1 47 7 May 1800 An Act making appropriation for the support of Government for the year one thousand eight hundred.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 65.
--
--
--
--
7 Nov. 1800
20 Jan. 1801
(1) The office of the War Dept. was destroyed by fire.
(2) A less-damaging fire occurred at the Treasury Dept.
ASP Miscellaneous 1, no. 142, p. 232 (link); no. 144, p. 241-243 (link); no. 146, p. 247-252 (link).
2 88 6/2 1 15 Dec. 1800 An Act extending the privilege of franking letters to the Delegate from the Territory of the United States, northwest of the river Ohio, and making provision for his compensation.  Northwest Territory.
2 102 6/2 9 25 Feb. 1801 An Act freeing from postage all letters and packets to John Adams.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1803, vol. 5, p. 263 (link).
Letters from John Adams, see 2 Stat. 125.
2 103-108 6/2 15 27 Feb. 1801 An Act concerning the District of Columbia.  See 1 Stat. 130 for further details.
2 117-121 6/2 27 3 Mar. 1801 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government for the year one thousand eight hundred and one.  Stamp-office, p. 118; post-office, p. 119, 120.
2 125-127 6/2 35 3 Mar. 1801 An Act further to alter and to establish certain Post Roads.  Free franking, letters and packets from John Adams, § 3.
Laws of the United States, Philadelphia, 1803, vol. 5, p. 313-316 (link).
-- -- -- -- 22 Dec. 1801 An engrossed bill to extend the privilege of franking letters to the Delegate from the Mississippi Territory, and making provision for his compensation. 
House Journal, vol. 4, p. 24 (link).
2 128-129 7/1 2 26 Jan. 1802 An Act concerning the Library for the use of both Houses of Congress.
2 130-131 7/1 5 18 Feb. 1802 An Act extending the privilege of franking and receiving letters, free of postage, to any person admitted, or to be admitted to take a seat in Congress, as a delegate; and providing compensation for such delegate.
Laws of the United States, Washington, 1803, vol. 6, p. 10-11 (link); Philadelphia, 1804, vol. 6, p. 10-11 (link).
2 132-137 7/1 9 16 Mar. 1802 An Act fixing the military peace establishment of the United States.  US Military Academy at West Point, § 26-28.
Previous land purchase at West Point, 5 July 1790, 1 Stat. 129b.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Military Academy, 16 Mar. 2002 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
2 152 7/1 25 14 Apr. 1802 An Act to revive, and continue in force, an act, intituled “An act to augment the salaries of the officers therein mentioned," passed the second day of March, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine.
2
67
2
2
173-175
407
201-202
350
7/1
83/1
7/2
9/1
40
337
7
8
30 Apr. 1802
7 Aug. 1953
19 Feb. 1803
21 Feb. 1806
(1) An Act to enable the people of the Eastern division of the territory northwest of the river Ohio to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union, on an equal footing with the original States, and for other purposes.  Ohio.  The boundary with Indiana Territory was moved eastward to a line north from the Ohio River at the Great Miami River, § 2.  The balance of the Northwest Territory was assigned to Indiana Territory, § 3.  The provision that "the said state, when formed, shall be admitted into the Union", § 1, is ambiguous.  It might have been effective on adoption of the state constitution, 29 Nov. 1802 (ref, ref), or when the General Assembly convened, 1 Mar. 1803 (ref), or when the Governor took office, 3 Mar. 1803, or when Congress recognized the action, 19 Feb. 1803 (3, below).  See also, Act of 3 Mar. 1803, 2 Stat. 225.
(2) [67 Stat. 407] Joint Resolution For admitting the State of Ohio into the Union.  Effective 1 Mar. 1803.
(3) An Act to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United States, within the state of Ohio.  This was the first act of Congress directly recognizing the State of Ohio, the constitution and government having been formed on 29 Nov. 1802, as noted in § 1, in accordance with the Act of 30 Apr. 1802 (1, above).
(4) An Act for the relief of the Governor, Secretary, and Judges of the late territory of the United States, northwest of the river Ohio.  Albert Gallatin, the Treasury Secretary, in Dec. 1804, asserted 29 Nov. 1802 as the end of the Territorial government in Ohio (ref), and would make no further payments.  Under the new state constitution, the territorial officers had continued their duties until replaced by state officers (Schedule, sec. 3, ref).  This act accepted 1 Mar. 1803, for the purpose of Federal compensation.  (One of the Ohio judges was Return J. Meigs, jr., later Postmaster General.)

The state constitution was delivered to the House 23 Dec. 1802 (ref); mention of the state of Ohio is noted on 28 Jan. 1803 (ref), 2 Feb. 1803 (ref), 3 Feb. 1803 (ref), 7 Feb. 1803 (ref), etc.  The state constitution was delivered to the Senate 7 Jan. 1803 (ref, ref).  It was clear from 19-21 Jan. 1803 that the Senate really did not know how to proceed (ref, ref), but they reported a bill on 27-28-31 Jan., delaying it until 3 Feb. (ref, ref), but actually 4 Feb. (ref, ref).  The bill passed the Senate 7 Feb. (ref), the House 12 Feb. (ref), and was signed 19 Feb. 1803 (ref).

The statement "Ohio was established as a State April 30, 1802" (footnote to the Northwest Ordinance at 2 Stat. 53) must be regarded as incorrect.  Donaldson, The Public Domain, 1884, p. 28, 160 and 422, accepts 29 Nov. 1802 as the effective date (ref, ref, ref).  I.W. Andrews, When was Ohio admitted into the Union?, Columbus, 1879 (ref), also 1887 (ref), notes the lack of a formal act of admission, and discusses seven claimed dates, settling between 29 Nov. 1802 and 19 Feb. 1803, and finally accepting 19 Feb. 1803.  R.R. Sloane, When did Ohio in fact become a sovereign state of the Union?, Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, vol. 9, 1900-1901, p. 278-289 (ref), accepts 1 Mar. 1803 as the admission date.  Shearer, 2004, vol. 2, p. 941-966, accepts 19 Feb. 1803, but places 1 Mar. 1803 in the chapter heading without explanation or citation.

Historical summaries are here and here; no two accounts of the affair agree.
Wikipedia, Enabling Act of 1802.
National Archives, 200th Anniversary of Ohio Statehood.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Ohio statehood, 2 Mar. 1953 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 1 Mar. 2003 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
2 184-188 7/1 47 1 May 1802 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government for the year one thousand eight hundred and two.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 186.
2 189-192 7/1 48 3 May 1802 An Act further to alter and establish certain Post Roads, and for the more secure carriage of the Mail of the United States.  Only free white persons may carry the mails, effective 1 Nov. 1802, § 4.  Free franking, § 5.

Laws of the United States, Washington, 1803, vol. 6, p. 164-172 (link); Philadelphia, 1804, vol. 6, p. 164-172 (link).
National Postal Museum, The History and Experience of African Americans in America's Postal Service (link).

The Postmaster General discussed the issue of mail carriers in March 1802, in letters to the Senate (link, link); the restriction of § 4 was plainly to make a slave revolt impossible.
2 210-215 7/2 19 2 Mar. 1803 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government for the year, one thousand eight hundred and three.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 212.
2 227-228 7/2 24 3 Mar. 1803 An Act making appropriations for the Military establishment of the United States, in the year one thousand eight hundred and three.  Appropriations "for postage on letters on public service".
2 245 8/1 1 31 Oct. 1803 An Act to enable the President of the United States to take possession of the territories ceded by France to the United States, by the treaty concluded at Paris, on the thirtieth of April last; and for the temporary government thereof.  Louisiana Territory.  Treaty and two conventions, signed 30 Apr. 1803, ratified 21 Oct. 1803, 8 Stat. 200 (here).  Funding by Acts of 10 Nov. 1803, 2 Stat. 245, 2 Stat. 247.  Formal transfer, 20 Dec. 1803 (ref).  Tax laws extended, 24 Feb. 1804, 2 Stat. 251.

The full extent of the Louisiana territory was not well-understood.  Despite US claims at the time and later, Oregon, the Red River basin, the Gulf Coast to the Rio Grande, and Florida were not included in the Louisiana Purchase.  About West Florida, see the Proclamation of 27 Oct. 1810, 11 Stat. 761, and multiple following items.

Wikipedia, Louisiana Purchase, Louisiana Territory.
Library of Congress, Louisiana Purchase: A Legislative Timeline (1802-1807).
Library of Congress, A Question of Boundaries.
State Papers and Correspondence bearing upon the Purchase of the Territory of Louisiana, Washington : Government Printing Office, 1903 (link).
2
2
3
3
250
713
309-310
484
8/1
12/1
14/1
15/2
12
66
103
27
20 Feb. 1804
24 Apr. 1812
27 Apr. 1816
20 Feb. 1819
(1) An Act continuing for a limited time, the salaries of the officers of government therein mentioned.  Postmaster-General and Assistant Postmaster-General.
(2) An Act to continue in force for a limited time, an act entituled "An act continuing for a limited time the salaries of the officers of government therein mentioned."  Postmaster-General and first assistant postmaster general.
(3) An Act continuing the salaries of certain officers of government.  See also, American State Papers, Miscellaneous, vol. II, p. 299-300 (link).
(4) An Act to increase the salaries of certain officers of government.  Postmaster General and two assistants.
Previous, see 1 Stat. 67, 1 Stat. 232 § 8, 1 Stat. 354 § 8.

Disagreement of a joint committee of conference, 29 Dec. 1803, ASP, Miscellaneous 1, No. 170, p. 385 (link).  PMG salary relative to other officers.
2 264-269 8/1 21 14 Mar. 1804 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and four.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 266.
2 272 8/1 27 19 Mar. 1804 An Act providing for the expenses of the Civil Government of Louisiana.
2 275-277 8/1 34 26 Mar. 1804 An Act further to alter and establish certain post roads, and for other purposes.  Free franking, § 3.
2 277-283 8/1 35 26 Mar. 1804 An Act making provision for the disposal of the public lands in the Indiana territory, and for other purposes.  Indian country, boundary to be marked, § 1.  Fees and postage, § 15.
2 283-289 8/1 38 26 Mar. 1804 An Act erecting Louisiana into two territories, and providing for the temporary government thereof.  Territory of Orleans, District of Louisiana; below and above 33° N.  US laws, including the postal laws, to apply, § 7.  District of Louisiana temporarily to be administered by Indiana Territory, § 12-13.  Indian country, land exchanges from east to west, § 15.  Effective 1 Oct. 1804, § 16.
The Territory of Orleans by this act included land "south of the Mississippi Territory", which put it in conflict with Spain's claim to (and control of) West Florida.
The District of Louisiana included the balance of the Louisiana Purchase.
See also, Act of 27 Mar. 1804, 2 Stat. 299, § 7.

Map, Historical diagram of Louisiana, Missouri [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Territory of Orleans, District of Louisiana.
District of Louisiana, renamed Territory of Louisiana, 3 Mar. 1805, 2 Stat. 331; renamed Missouri Territory, 4 June 1812, 2 Stat. 743.
Louisiana statehood, 30 Apr. 1812, 2 Stat. 641, 2 Stat. 701.

Remonstrance of the People of Louisiana Against the Political System Adopted by Congress for Them, Communicated to the Senate, 31 Dec. 1804; in American State Papers, Miscellaneous, vol. 1, p. 396-399 (link).  Similar documents in the same volume.
2 306 8/1 -- 12 Dec. 1803 Joint Resolution, proposing the Twelfth Amendment to the Constitution.  Ratification was completed 15 June 1804, and certified by proclamation of the Secretary of State, 25 Sep. 1804 (ref).
See also, Act of 26 Mar. 1804, 2 Stat. 295.

Documentary History of the Constitution, vol. 2, p. 408-451 (link).
House Manual, Amendment XII (PDF).
Constitution Annotated, Twelfth Amendment (PDF).
Wikipedia, Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution.
2 309-310 8/2 5 11 Jan. 1805 An Act to divide the Indiana Territory into two separate governments.  Michigan Territory.  Divided along an east-west line through the southern extreme of Lake Michigan, to Lake Erie, and a north-south path through the middle of Lake Michigan at the same extreme point.  Effective "from and after" 30 June 1805.
Michigan Territory was decreased at the southern border by a transfer to Indiana (1816); increased with the balance of Indiana Territory (1818), Illinois Territory (1818), and Missouri Territory (1834); and decreased by the formation of Wisconsin Territory (1836).  The boundary with Ohio was not settled until 1836, just before statehood.

Map, Historical diagram of Indiana, Michigan [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Michigan Territory.
Michigan statehood, 26 Jan. 1837, 5 Stat. 49, 5 Stat. 144.
2 315 8/2 16 14 Feb. 1805 An Act authorizing the Postmaster-General to make a new contract for carrying the mail from Fayetteville, in North Carolina, to Charleston, in South Carolina.
2 316-321 8/2 21 1 Mar. 1805 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and five.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 319.
2 322-323 8/2 23 2 Mar. 1805 An Act further providing for the government of the territory of Orleans.  Effective "from and after" 4 July 1805.  Preparation for Louisiana statehood.
2 331-332 8/2 31 3 Mar. 1805 An Act further providing for the government of the district [or, territory] of Louisiana.  Territory of Louisiana.  Effective 4 July 1805.  This ended the administration by Indiana Territory.

Wikipedia, Louisiana Territory.
2 337-338 8/2 35 3 Mar. 1805 An Act further to alter and establish certain post roads; and for other purposes.
2 357-359 9/1 19 29 Mar. 1806 An Act to regulate the laying out and making a road from Cumberland, in the state of Maryland, to the state of Ohio.
Pres. Monroe discussed at length the need for repairs to the road, when he vetoed a bill to do so, 4 May 1822 (link).
The road was later extended to Indiana and Illinois; for example, Acts of 3 Mar. 1837, 5 Stat. 195; 25 May 1838, 5 Stat. 228.  On tolls for the mail service, see 4 Stat. 483, 4 Stat. 655.

Wikipedia, National Road.
2 384-389 9/1 33 18 Apr. 1806 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and six.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 386.
2 396-397 9/1 41 21 Apr. 1806 An Act to regulate and fix the compensation of clerks, and to authorize the laying out certain public roads; and for other purposes.  Postmaster General's office, § 2.  The names and compensation of the clerks were to be published annually, § 5.

Reports for 1813: Treasury (link), Post Office (link), War Dept. (link), Customs (link).
Reports for 1815: Customs (link).
Reports for 1816: Treasury (link).
2 408-410 9/1 55 21 Apr. 1806 An Act further to alter and establish certain Post Roads; and for other purposes.
2 432-436 9/2 29 3 Mar. 1807 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government during the year one thousand eight hundred and seven.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 434.
2 444 9/2 43 3 Mar. 1807 An Act to establish certain Post Roads; and for other purposes.
-- -- -- -- 17 Aug. 1807 Robert Fulton's North River Steamboat of Clermont traveled the Hudson River from New York City to Albany, 17 Aug. 1807, becoming the first commercially successful steamboat.  Rebuilt in 1808, it began regular service on that route, carrying mail under the 1799 ship letter rate until retired in July 1814.  Fulton's company took the first steamboat mail contract with the Post Office in April 1815 (ref, ref).

Commemorative postage stamps -- Fulton and the Clermont, 25 Sep. 1909 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC, WC), 19 Aug. 1965 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC, A Stamp a Day).
Wikipedia, North River Steamboat.
2 456-457 10/1 14 27 Jan. 1808 An Act to continue in force for a limited time an act, intituled “An act continuing for a limited time the salaries of the officers of government therein mentioned”.
2 462-466 10/1 17 10 Feb. 1808 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government during the year one thousand eight hundred and eight.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 464.
2 483-484 10/1 44 13 Apr. 1808 An Act to authorize the transportation of certain documents by mail, free of postage.  Message of the President, 22 Mar. 1808.
2 484-485 10/1 48 21 Apr. 1808 An Act concerning public contracts.  Members of Congress may not be government contractors.  Postmaster-General to make annual reports, § 5.
2 491 10/1 56 23 Apr. 1808 An Act to establish certain post roads in the states of Georgia and Ohio.
-- -- 10/2 -- 9 Nov. 1808 House Resolution, Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, 17 members (one from each state).
House Journal, 10th Congress, 2nd Session, 9 Nov. 1808, p. 20-21.
Transferred to the Committee on the Post Office and Civil Service, 1946.
2 505 10/2 1 18 Nov. 1808 An Act to authorize the transportation of a certain Message of the President of the United States, and documents accompanying the same.
2 514-516 10/2 13 3 Feb. 1809 An Act for dividing the Indiana Territory into two separate governments.  Illinois Territory.  Divided along the Wabash River to Post Vincennes, then northward to the national boundary.  Effective "from and after" 1 Mar. 1809.
Western boundary, islands in the Mississippi River, Acts of 16 Apr. 1814, 3 Stat. 125; 27 Feb. 1815, 3 Stat. 218 § 1.
Upon Indiana statehood (1816) the dividing line was changed to follow the Wabash River farther north, but otherwise unchanged.  Upon Illinois statehood (1818), the balance of Illinois Territory was added to Michigan Territory.

Map, Historical diagram of Indiana [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Illinois Territory.
Illinois statehood, 3 Dec. 1818, 3 Stat. 428, 3 Stat. 536.
2 520-525 10/2 18 17 Feb. 1809 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government during the year one thousand eight hundred and nine.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 522.
2 526 10/2 20 28 Feb. 1809 An Act freeing from postage all letters and packets to Thomas Jefferson.
On this subject, in 1812, letter of Gideon Granger, Postmaster General (link).
2 552 11/1 14 28 June 1809 An Act freeing from postage all letters and packets from Thomas Jefferson.
2 554 11/2 1 9 Dec. 1809 An Act to authorize the transportation of certain Documents free of postage.  Message of the President, 29 Nov. 1809.
2 557-562 11/2 13 26 Feb. 1810 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government during the year one thousand eight hundred and ten.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 559.
2 564-568 11/2 17 26 Mar. 1810 An Act providing for the third census or enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States.

Additional, 12 Apr. 1810, 2 Stat. 570; 1 May 1810, 2 Stat. 605; 2 Mar. 1811, 2 Stat. 658.
Apportionment, 21 Dec. 1811, 2 Stat. 669.

Wikipedia, 1810 United States census.
US Census Bureau, 1810 Census, Overview, Publications.   The census reference date was 6 Aug. 1810.
2 579-589 11/2 30 28 Apr. 1810 An Act to establish Post Roads.
2
2
589-590
691-692
11/2
12/1
34
35
28 Apr. 1810
7 Mar. 1812
(1) An Act providing for the better accommodation of the General Post-office and Patent Office, and for other purposes.  Blodget's Hotel was purchased; see Report of 25 Jan. 1811 (link), and 6 Stat. 347b.
(2) An Act supplementary to “An act providing for the better accommodation of the General Post-office and Patent Office, and for other purposes”.  Thomas Munroe, noted in § 3, was Postmaster of Washington City, 1799-1829 (ref).

The patent system was established by the Acts of 10 Apr. 1790, 1 Stat. 109; 21 Feb. 1793, 1 Stat. 318; etc.
2 592-604 11/2 37 30 Apr. 1810 An Act regulating the Post-office Establishment.  Only free white persons may carry the mails, § 4.  Post Offices to be open every day, § 9; including the Sabbath, which caused objections.  Ship letters, § 12, 14-15, 32.  Way letters, § 17.  Free franking, § 24-26.  Post Office employees exempt from militia duty and jury duty, § 33.  Effective 1 June 1810, § 42.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1810Act.pdf
Comments by PMG Granger, Feb. 1810 (link).

Notes, Previous acts for the regulation of the Post-office Department, 1789-1845, p. 592-593.
Notes, Privilege of Franking, p. 599-600.
Notes, Circuit Court decisions, postmasters accounts, p. 602.
2 613 11/2 2 1 May 1810 Resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States.  Penalty for accepting foreign titles or emoluments.  Date from Annals of Congress (ref).

The most notorious error in the Bioren & Duane compilation of Laws was the inclusion of this unratified "Thirteenth Amendment" at vol. 1, p. 74 (ref), with a widely-overlooked disclaimer on p. ix (ref).  See, for example, Wikipedia, Titles of Nobility Amendment, and the references therein, especially Jol A. Silversmith, The "Missing Thirteenth Amendment": Constitutional Nonsense and Titles of Nobility, 1999 (link).
11 761-762 -- 12 27 Oct. 1810 Proclamation respecting taking possession of part of Louisiana.  West Florida, between the Mississippi and Perdido rivers.  Previously claimed by France and Spain, from differing interpretations of treaties signed in 1763, 1783, 1795, 1800, 1803; held by Britain 1763-1783, by Spain since 1783.  Claimed by the US on the (specious) ground that West Florida had become part of Louisiana in 1800, and thus had been purchased in 1803.  Orleans Territory created a county extending from the Mississippi River to the Perdido River, 7 Dec. 1810.  Annexed by parts to Louisiana (14 Apr. 1812, 2 Stat. 708) and Mississippi Territory (14 May 1812, 2 Stat. 734); the balance of West Florida, from the Perdido River to the Apalachicola River, remained in Spanish control.  East and West Florida were formally transferred from Spain to the US by the Treaty of 22 Feb. 1819, 8 Stat. 252.

https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Madison/03-02-02-0752
https://millercenter.org/the-presidency/presidential-speeches/october-27-1810...
https://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/pages/Florida.html
https://publications.newberry.org/ahcbp/pages/Louisiana.html
Wikipedia, Republic of West Florida.
2 614 11/3 1 17 Dec. 1810 An Act to authorize the transportation of certain documents free of postage.  Message of the President, 5 Dec. 1810.
2
3
2
3
666b
471-472
666a
472b
11/3
11/3
11/3
12/2
--
--
47
--
15 Jan. 1811
15 Jan. 1811
3 Mar. 1811
12 Feb. 1813
(1) Resolution relative to the occupation of the Floridas by the United States of America.  Also, 3 Stat. 471a, with introduction.
(2) An Act to enable the President of the United States, under certain contingencies, to take possession [from Spain] of the country lying east of the river Perdido, and south of the state of Georgia and the Mississippi territory, and for other purposes.  East Florida.  This act was kept secret at the time, by the following act.
(3) An Act concerning an act to enable the President of the United States, under certain contingencies, to take possession of the country lying east of the river Perdido, and south of the state of Georgia and the Mississippi territory, and for other purposes, and the declaration accompanying the same.  East Florida.  Also, 3 Stat. 472a.
(4) An Act authorizing the President of the United States to take possession of a tract of country lying south of the Mississippi territory and west of the river Perdido.  West Florida.  Not published until 1818; see the Act of 25 Apr. 1812, 2 Stat. 713.  See also, Acts of 14 Apr. 1812 and 14 May 1812, 2 Stat. 708 and 2 Stat. 734; Private Act of 18 Apr. 1814, 6 Stat. 139a.

See also, Senate Executive Journal, 3-18 Jan. and 3 Mar. 1811 (link), 26 June - 3 July 1812 (link), not published until 1828.
David Hunter Miller, Secret Statutes of the United States, 1918 (link).
Wikipedia, East Florida, West Florida, Republic of West Florida, Florida Parishes (of Louisiana).
2 615 11/3 4 17 Jan. 1811 An Act to fix the compensation of the additional assistant Postmaster-General.
2
2
2
641-643
701-704
708-709
11/3
12/1
12/1
21
50
57
20 Feb. 1811
8 Apr. 1812
14 Apr. 1812
(1) An Act to enable the people of the Territory of Orleans to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union, on an equal footing with the original states, and for other purposes.  Louisiana.  West to the Sabine River, north to 33° N, east to the Mississippi River and through Lake Pontchartrain to the Gulf of Mexico.
(2) An Act for the admission of the State of Louisiana into the Union, and to extend the laws of the United States to the said state.  Effective "from and after" 30 Apr. 1812.  See also, letter of Albert Gallatin, Treasury Secretary, asserting statehood commenced on 1 May 1812 (link).  Extent as for (1).  See also, Act of 22 May 1812, 2 Stat. 743.
(3) An Act to enlarge the limits of the state of Louisiana.  Annexing part of West Florida, eastward to the Pearl River.  Accepted by the Louisiana Legislature, 4 Aug. 1812 (ref).  For West Florida from the Pearl River to the Perdido River, see Mississippi Territory, Act of 14 May 1812, 2 Stat. 734.

The western boundary of Louisiana claimed in (1) and (2) was settled with Spain, by treaty, 22 Feb. 1819, 8 Stat. 252; this was later incumbent upon Mexico, 12 Jan. 1828, 8 Stat. 372 (continued 3 Apr. 1835, 8 Stat. 464), and Texas, 25 Apr. 1838, 8 Stat. 511 (Miller, Treaties, vol. 3, p. 405-420; vol. 3, p. 823-833; vol. 4, p. 133-143).  Boundary with Texas, Act of 15 June 1844, 5 Stat. 674; Act of 5 July 1848, 9 Stat. 245; Texas Act of 24 Nov. 1849 (link).  The extended eastern boundary was also settled by the 1819 treaty.

National Archives, Louisiana Statehood, 1812.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Louisiana statehood, 30 Apr. 1962 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC, WC), 30 Apr. 2012 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
2 643-648 11/3 22 20 Feb. 1811 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government during the year one thousand eight hundred and eleven.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 645.
2 667 12/1 1 18 Nov. 1811 An Act to authorize the transportation of certain documents free of postage.  Message of the President, 5 Nov. 1811, 7 Nov. 1811.
Session laws, link.
2 686-691 12/1 33 26 Feb. 1812 An Act making appropriations for the support of Government during the year one thousand eight hundred and twelve.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 688.
2 696-699 12/1 46 28 Mar. 1812 An Act to establish a Quartermaster's Department, and for other purposes.  Free franking, § 10.
2 713-716 12/1 67 25 Apr. 1812 An Act for ascertaining the titles and claims to Lands in that part of the Louisiana which lies east of the river Mississippi and island of New Orleans.  Divides West and East Florida as two land districts, at the Pearl River, up to the Perdido River, though the US claim was not (yet) accepted by Spain.
2 716-718 12/1 68 25 Apr. 1812 An Act for the establishment of a General Land-Office in the Department of the Treasury.  Free franking, § 11.
2 730-732 12/1 80 11 May 1812 An Act to alter and establish certain Post Roads.
2 734 12/1 84 14 May 1812 Mississippi Territory, see 1 Stat. 549.
2 741 12/1 88 20 May 1812 An Act to authorize the President of the United States to ascertain and designate certain boundaries.  To survey the western and northern boundaries of Ohio; not undertaken until 1817 and 1818.
See also, Acts of 14 July 1832, 4 Stat. 596; 15 June 1836, 5 Stat. 49.
2 743-747 12/1 95 4 June 1812 An Act providing for the government of the territory of Missouri.  Louisiana Territory, renamed and reorganized as Missouri Territory.  Effective 7 Dec. 1812.  Supplementary Act, 29 Apr. 1816, 3 Stat. 328.

Map, Historical diagram of Missouri [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Missouri Territory.
Missouri statehood, 10 Aug. 1821, 3 Stat. 545, 3 Stat. 797.
2
8
755
218-223
12/1
--
102
--
18 June 1812
24 Dec. 1814
(1) An Act declaring War between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the dependencies thereof, and the United States of America and their territories.
(2) Treaty of Peace and Amity, Between his Britannic Majesty and the United States of America.  Ratified 17 Feb. 1815.
Wikipedia, War of 1812, Treaty of Ghent.
2 778-781 12/1 129 6 July 1812 An Act to prohibit American vessels from proceeding to or trading with the enemies of the United States, and for other purposes.  British packets, § 5.
2 784-785 12/1 137 6 July 1812 An Act making further provision for the Army of the United States, and for other purposes.  Free franking, § 3.
2 787 12/2 1 12 Nov. 1812 An Act to authorize the transportation of certain documents free of postage.  Message of the President, 4 Nov. 1812.
2 790 12/2 9 14 Jan. 1813 An Act authorizing the President of the United States to establish post routes, in certain cases.  During wartime, for the army.
2 805 12/2 34 27 Feb. 1813 An Act in addition to an act regulating the Post-office establishment.  Steamboats may carry the mail.
2 806 12/2 36 27 Feb. 1813 An Act to establish certain post roads in the State of Louisiana.
2 806-807 12/2 37 27 Feb. 1813 An Act to encourage Vaccination.  Free franking, § 2.  Repealed, 4 May 1822, 3 Stat. 677.
2 816-818 12/2 48 3 Mar. 1813 An Act the better to provide for the supplies of the Army of the United States, and for the accountability of persons entrusted with the same.  Free franking, § 2.
2 819-820 12/2 52 3 Mar. 1813 An Act for the better organization of the general staff of the Army of the United States.  Free franking, § 11.
2 823-829 12/2 58 3 Mar. 1813 An Act making appropriation for the support of Government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 826.



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US Statutes at Large, Volume 3, 1813-1823, published 1846, 1850, 1854, 1856, 1861

This volume contains acts of the Thirteenth through Seventeenth Congresses.

Washington, D.C., was captured and burned by British forces, 24 Aug. 1814.

Indiana was admitted to the Union, 11 Dec. 1816, 3 Stat. 399; Mississippi, 10 Dec. 1817, 3 Stat. 472; Illinois, 3 Dec. 1818, 3 Stat. 536; Alabama, 14 Dec. 1819, 3 Stat. 608; Maine, 3 Mar. 1820, effective 15 Mar. 1820, 3 Stat. 544; Missouri, 10 Aug. 1821, 3 Stat. 797.

Alabama was organized as a Territory, 3 Mar. 1817, effective 25 Sep. 1817, 3 Stat. 371; Arkansas, 2 Mar. 1819, effective "from and after" 4 July 1819, 3 Stat. 493; Florida, 30 Mar. 1822, 3 Stat. 654.  The balance of Indiana Territory and Illinois Territory (after statehood for Indiana and Illinois) was attached to Michigan Territory, 3 Stat. 428 § 7.
Public Acts and Resolutions in vol. 3, Private Acts and Resolutions in vol. 6.
Congress special sessions regular sessions Public Private Profiles
13th -- 24 May 1813 – 2 Aug. 1813
6 Dec. 1813 – 18 Apr. 1814
19 Sep. 1814 – 3 Mar. 1815
p. 1-87
p. 88-142
p. 143-250
p. 120-126
p. 127-144
p. 145-155
13th
14th -- 4 Dec. 1815 – 30 Apr. 1816
2 Dec. 1816 – 3 Mar. 1817
p. 251-343
p. 344-400
p. 156-182
p. 183-196
14th
15th 4 – 6 Mar. 1817 1 Dec. 1817 – 20 Apr. 1818
16 Nov. 1818 – 3 Mar. 1819
p. 401-476
p. 477-538
p. 197-215
p. 216-235
15th
16th -- 6 Dec. 1819 – 15 May 1820
13 Nov. 1820 – 3 Mar. 1821
p. 539-609
p. 610-648
p. 236-253
p. 254-262
16th
17th -- 3 Dec. 1821 – 8 May 1822
2 Dec. 1822 – 3 Mar. 1823
p. 649-719
p. 720-790
p. 263-279
p. 280-289
17th
House Journal, Senate Journal, Senate Executive Journal, Annals of Congress
    Serial Set, House Journal, (15) 4, 16; (16) 30, 47; (17) 62, 75
    Serial Set, Senate Journal, (15) 1, 13; (16) 25, 41; (17) 58, 72
    House Journal, 13/1, 13/2, 13/3; 14/1, 14/2; 15/1, 15/2; 16/1, 16/2; 17/1, 17/2
    House Journal, reprinted 1977, 13/1, 13/2, 13/3; 14/1, 14/2
    Senate Journal, 13/1, 13/2, 13/3; 14/1, 14/2; 15/sp, 15/1, 15/2; 16/1, 16/2; 17/1, 17/2
    Senate Journal, reprinted 1977, 13/1, 13/2, 13/3; 14/1, 14/2; 15/sp
    Senate Executive Journal, vol. 2, 13/1, 13/2, 13/3; vol. 3, 14/1, 14/2; 15/sp, 15/1, 15/2; 16/1, 16/2; 17/1, 17/2
1846
1850
1854, as 1850
1856, as 1854
1861, as 1854
Accumulated from the edition of 1846, PDF

Public Acts, vol. 3, p. 1-790

Vol. Pages C/S Ch. Act of ... Title
3 4 13/1 9 13 July 1813 An Act freeing from postage all letters and packets to and from the superintendent general of military supplies.
3 39 13/1 22 24 July 1813 An Act to establish the office of commissioner of the revenue.  Free franking, § 6.
Office previously established, 8 May 1792, 1 Stat. 279 § 6; discontinued, 6 Apr. 1802, 2 Stat. 148 § 2.
Office abolished, 23 Dec. 1817, 3 Stat. 401 § 2.
3 48-49 13/1 33 28 July 1813 An Act to authorize the transportation of certain documents free of postage.  Message of the President, 12 July 1813.
-- -- -- -- 8 Dec. 1813 House Resolution, commencing the US Serial Set.
Journal of the House of Representatives, vol. 9, p. 166-167 (link).
3 106-111 13/2 28 24 Mar. 1814 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 108-109.
3 129-130 13/2 69 18 Apr. 1814 An Act authorizing a subscription for the laws of the United States, and for the distribution thereof.  The Bioren & Duane edition.
Resolution, for distribution, 3 Mar. 1815, 3 Stat. 250.
3 130-133 13/2 75 18 Apr. 1814 An Act to alter and establish certain post-roads.  Free franking, § 4.
3 137-139 13/2 91 18 Apr. 1814 An Act to amend the act laying duties on licenses to retailers of wines, spirituous liquors and foreign merchandise, and for other purposes.  Free franking, Commissioner of the Revenue, § 10.
3 140-141 13/2 1 27 Dec. 1813 Resolution for the printing and distribution of an additional number of the journals of Congress, and of the documents published under their order.
3 145-146 13/3 6 21 Nov. 1814 An Act to authorize the publication of the laws of the United States within the territories of the United States.  In newspapers.
3 159-161 13/3 16 23 Dec. 1814 An Act to provide additional revenues for defraying the expenses of government, and maintaining the public credit, by duties on sales at auction, and on licenses to retail wines, spirituous liquors, and foreign merchandise, and for increasing the rates of postage.  Rates of postage, § 2, effective "from and after" 1 Feb. 1815; repealed, Act of 1 Feb. 1816, 3 Stat. 252.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1814Act.pdf

See also, House Committee of Ways and Means, report, 10 Oct. 1814 (link).
3 164-180 13/3 21 9 Jan. 1815 An Act to provide additional revenues for defraying the expenses of government, ... .  Deputy Postmasters to assume the role of tax assessor and collector when no other person is available, § 37, p. 178.
3 195 13/3 27 30 Jan. 1815 An Act to authorize the purchase of the library of Thomas Jefferson, late President of the United States.  To replace the library of Congress burned in 1814.
See also, Resolution of 21 Oct. 1814, 3 Stat. 246; Act of 3 Mar. 1815, 3 Stat. 225.

E. Millicent Sowerby, Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson, Washington : Library of Congress, 1952-1959, 5 vol., https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001166326.  Reprinted, 1983.
James Gilreath, Sowerby Revirescent and Revised, The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America, 1984, vol. 78, p. 219-232, https://www.jstor.org/stable/24302785.
Douglas L. Wilson, Sowerby Revisited: The Unfinished Catalogue of Thomas Jefferson's Library, The William and Mary Quarterly, Oct. 1984, vol. 41, p. 615-628, https://www.jstor.org/stable/1919156.
3 202-203 13/3 35 7 Feb. 1815 An Act to alter and amend the several acts for establishing a Navy Department, by adding thereto a board of commissioners.  Free franking, § 3.
3 206-211 13/3 44 16 Feb. 1815 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and fifteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 209.
3 220-221 13/3 65 27 Feb. 1815 An Act in addition to the act regulating the post-office establishment.  Commissions and allowances for postmasters, § 1-2.  Steamboat letters and fees, § 3-5.
3 221-222 13/3 69 1 Mar. 1815 An Act to alter and establish certain post-roads.
3 239-244 13/3 100 3 Mar. 1815 An Act to fix the compensations, and increase the responsibility of the collectors of the direct tax and internal duties; and for other purposes connected with the collection thereof.  Free franking, § 7.
3 252 14/1 7 1 Feb. 1816 An Act to repeal so much of an act, passed on the twenty-third day of December, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen [3 Stat. 159], as imposes additional duties on postage.  Effective "from and after" 31 Mar. 1816.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1816RepealAct.pdf
3 261-264 14/1 40 9 Apr. 1816 An Act to authorize the payment for property lost, captured, or destroyed by the enemy, while in the military service of the United States, and for other purposes.  Free franking, § 11, 13.
3 264-266 14/1 43 9 Apr. 1816 An Act in addition to an act to regulate the Post-office establishment.  Rates of postage, effective "from and after" 1 May 1816, § 1; free franking, § 3; balance of the act effective "from and after" 31 Mar. 1816, § 5.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1816Act.pdf

Sec. 5 was unusual.  Most acts take effect on or after passage, not before.
3 266-277 14/1 44 10 Apr. 1816 An Act to incorporate the subscribers to the Bank of the United States.  Second Bank of the United States, chartered for 20 years.  Opened 7 Jan. 1817.

Pres. Jackson vetoed the recharter attempt in 1832 and withdrew the federal deposits in 1833; the bank was rechartered in Pennsylvania in Feb. 1836, and expired in Feb. 1841.
Pres. Tyler vetoed the Fiscal Bank of the United States in 1841 (ref, ref), favored by the Whigs and Henry Clay; the entire cabinet (excepting Daniel Webster) resigned in protest.

Wikipedia, Second Bank of the United States, Presidency of John Tyler.
3 277-283 14/1 45 16 Apr. 1816 An Act making appropriations for the support of government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and sixteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 281.
3
3
3
3
289-291
399-400
390-391
428-431
14/1
14/2
14/2
15/1
57
1
100
67
19 Apr. 1816
11 Dec. 1816
3 Mar. 1817
18 Apr. 1818
(1) An Act to enable the people of the Indiana Territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union on an equal footing with the original states.  The northern boundary of Indiana with Michigan Territory was moved 10 miles farther north.  The western boundary of Indiana with Illinois Territory was changed to continue farther north along the Wabash River.  Accepted by the Indiana Convention, 29 June 1816 (ref).
(2) Resolution for admitting the state of Indiana into the Union.
(3) An Act to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United States within the State of Indiana.
(4) An Act to enable the people of the Illinois territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union on an equal footing with the original states.  The balance of Indiana Territory, on the upper peninsula of Michigan, was added to Michigan Territory, § 7.
Northern boundary of Indiana, surveyed by Act of 2 Mar. 1827, 4 Stat. 236.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Indiana statehood, 16 Apr. 1966 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 7 June 2016 (MSC).
3 302-306 14/1 82 26 Apr. 1816 An Act supplementary to the act to provide additional revenues for defraying the expenses of government and maintaining the public credit, by laying a direct tax upon the United States, and to provide for assessing and collecting the same.  Free franking, § 13.
3 322 14/1 140 29 Apr. 1816 An Act supplementary to an act making alterations in the Treasury and War Departments, passed the eighth day of May, 1792.  Free franking, § 1.
3 334-338 14/1 171 30 Apr. 1816 An Act to establish post-roads.
-- -- -- -- 10 Dec. 1816 Senate Resolution (link), establishing the Committee on the Post-Office and Post-Roads (ref).
3
3
3
348-349
472-473
413
14/2
15/1
15/1
23
1
29
1 Mar. 1817
10 Dec. 1817
3 Apr. 1818
(1) An Act to enable the people of the western part of the Mississippi territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the union, on an equal footing with the original states.
(2) Resolution for the admission of the State of Mississippi into the Union.
(3) An Act to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United states within the state of Mississippi.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Mississippi statehood, 11 Dec. 1967 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 31 Mar. 2017 (NPM, MSC).
3 350 14/2 25 1 Mar. 1817 An Act freeing from postage all letters and packets to and from James Madison.
3 352-358 14/2 33 3 Mar. 1817 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and seventeen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 355.
3 363-366 14/2 44 3 Mar. 1817 An Act to alter and establish certain post-roads.
3 366-368 14/2 45 3 Mar. 1817 An Act to provide for the prompt settlement of public accounts.  Fifth Auditor of the Treasury, for the Post Office accounts, § 4.  Free franking, § 16.
Four additional auditors were authorized, and duties assigned, by § 3-4: First, for the Treasury Dept.; Second and Third, for the Army, and the War Dept.; Fourth, for the Navy Dept.; Fifth, for the State Dept., General Post Office, and Indian Affairs.  The duties were modified by later acts.  For the Sixth Auditor, see 5 Stat. 80.
See also, American State Papers, Miscellaneous, vol. II, p. 396-399 (link), 466 (link).
3 371-373 14/2 59 3 Mar. 1817 An Act to establish a separate territorial government for the eastern part of the Mississippi territory.  Alabama Territory.  By § 5, effective upon establishment of the Mississippi state government, 15 Aug. 1817 (per 10 Dec. 1817, 3 Stat. 472); or, when the Alabama Governor was commissioned, 25 Sep. 1817 (ref, ref, ref); or, [incorrectly] on proclamation of Mississippi statehood, 10 Dec. 1817.

Map, Historical diagram of Georgia, Mississippi [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Alabama Territory.
Alabama statehood, 14 Dec. 1819, 3 Stat. 489, 3 Stat. 608.
3 415 15/1 34 4 Apr. 1818 An Act to establish the flag of the United States.
3 418-423 15/1 45 9 Apr. 1818 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 421.
3 426-427 15/1 61 14 Apr. 1818 An Act regulating the staff of the army.  Free franking, § 10.
3
3
3
428-431
536
502-503
15/1
15/2
15/2
67
1
70
18 Apr. 1818
3 Dec. 1818
3 Mar. 1819
(1) An Act to enable the people of the Illinois territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union on an equal footing with the original states.  The northern boundary was set at 42° 30′ N between Lake Michigan and the Mississippi River.  The balance of Indiana Territory and of Illinois Territory together were assigned to Michigan Territory, § 7.
(2) Resolution declaring the admission of the state of Illinois into the Union.
(3) An Act to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United States within the state of Illinois.
Northern boundary, Act of 2 Mar. 1831, 4 Stat. 479.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Illinois statehood, 12 Feb. 1968 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 5 Mar. 2018 (MSC).
3 439-440 15/1 80 20 Apr. 1818 An Act to provide for the publication of the laws of the United States, and for other purposes.  In newspapers, § 1-3.  Editions to succeed those by Bioren and Duane, § 4-6.
An index for the session laws was authorized by Resolution of 3 Apr. 1818, 3 Stat. 475.
Amended, 11 May 1820, 3 Stat. 576.
3 445-447 15/1 87 20 Apr. 1818 An Act to regulate and fix the compensation of the clerks in the different offices.  Postmaster General's office, § 7.
3 453-457 15/1 92 20 Apr. 1818 An Act to establish and alter certain post roads.
-- -- -- -- 1819 First Steamship to cross the Atlantic, May-June 1819, the Savannah, by steam and sail, without passengers or cargo.
Commemorative postage stamp -- 22 May 1944 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC).

Regular steamship crossings began in 1838, by British ships, and 1847, by American ships.
Wikipedia, SS Savannah, SS Sirius, SS Great Western, Steamship.
Smithsonian, Logbook for First Transatlantic Steamship Savannah, 1819.
Smithsonian, National Postal Museum, Transatlantic Mail.
3 488-489 15/2 46 2 Mar. 1819 An Act regulating passenger ships and vessels.  Passenger manifest now required for US arrivals.
3
3
3
489-492
608
564-565
15/2
16/1
16/1
47
1
47
2 Mar. 1819
14 Dec. 1819
21 Apr. 1820
(1) An Act to enable the people of the Alabama territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union on an equal footing with the original states.
(2) Resolution declaring the admission of the state of Alabama into the Union.
(3) An Act to establish a district court in the state of Alabama.  Laws extended.
Boundary with Florida, Act of 2 Mar. 1831, 4 Stat. 479.

Encyclopedia of Alabama, Historic Origins of Alabama's Boundaries.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Alabama statehood, 2 Aug. 1969 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 23 Feb. 2019 (MSC).
3 493-496 15/2 49 2 Mar. 1819 An Act establishing a separate territorial government in the southern part of the territory of Missouri.  Arkansaw Territory; Arkansas Territory since Apr. 1820.  Effective "from and after" 4 July 1819.  The extent of present-day Arkansas, plus Oklahoma without the panhandle.  Northern boundary, 36° 30′ N east to the St. Francis River, then 36° N east to the Mississippi River.  Western boundary, 100° W, by the treaty with Spain, 22 Feb. 1819.  Southern boundary, following the 1819 treaty line (Red River) and the northern boundary of Louisiana (33° N).

Supplementary act, 21 Apr. 1820, 3 Stat. 565.  Western boundary moved eastward, 26 May 1824, 4 Stat. 40, referring to the 18 Oct. 1820 treaty with Choctaw Nation, 7 Stat. 210; moved further eastward by treaty with Cherokee Nation, 6 May 1828, 7 Stat. 311.  Boundary with Louisiana, 19 May 1828, 4 Stat. 276.

Map, Historical diagram of Missouri, Arkansas [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Arkansas Territory.
Arkansas statehood, 15 June 1836, 5 Stat. 50.
3 496 15/2 52 2 Mar. 1819 An Act authorizing the Postmaster General to contract, as in other cases, for carrying the mail in steamboats, between New Orleans, in the state of Louisiana, and Louisville, in the state of Kentucky.
3 496-502 15/2 54 3 Mar. 1819 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and nineteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 499.
3 503-508 15/2 72 3 Mar. 1819 An Act to alter and establish certain post-roads.
3 536 15/2 107 3 Mar. 1819 An Act to repeal part of an act passed on the twenty-seventh day of February, one thousand eight hundred and thirteen, entitled “An act in addition to ʻAn act regulating the Post-office establishmentʼ ”.
3 539 16/1 1 14 Dec. 1819 An Act authorizing the transmission of certain documents free of postage.  Any documents ordered to be printed by Congress.
3 544 16/1 19 3 Mar. 1820 An Act for the admission of the state of Maine into the Union.  Effective "from and after" 15 Mar. 1820.
Maine had been a district of Massachusetts (last modified in the 1691 charter), so no further federal statehood legislation was necessary beyond reapportionment (7 Apr. 1820, 3 Stat. 555).  The State of Maine officially recognizes Mar. 15 as Statehood Day (ref).
Massachusetts Acts of 19 June 1819 (ref), 25 Feb. 1820 (ref).

Boundary with Canada, Act of 17 Apr. 1828, 4 Stat. 262; 1831 arbitration, Van Zandt (1976), p. 15-17 (link); Act of 20 July 1840, 5 Stat. 402; Act of 27 Feb. 1841, 5 Stat. 413; Treaty of 9 Aug. 1842, 8 Stat. 572; Act of 3 Mar. 1843, 5 Stat. 623.  Wikipedia, St. Croix River (Maine-New Brunswick).

Commemorative postage stamps -- Maine statehood, 9 July 1970 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC), 15 Mar. 2020 (MSC).
3
3
3
3
545-548
645
797
653-654
16/1
16/2
--
17/1
22
1
--
12
6 Mar. 1820
2 Mar. 1821
10 Aug. 1821
16 Mar. 1822
(1) An Act to authorize the people of the Missouri territory to form a constitution and state government, and for the admission of such state into the Union on an equal footing with the original states, and to prohibit slavery in certain territories.  The southern boundary is mostly along 36° 30′ N, plus a section south to 36° N between the Mississippi and St. Francis Rivers (ref, ref).  The western boundary is a north-south line through the mouth of the Kansas River at the Missouri River, later extended westward along the Missouri.  The northern boundary follows a parallel from the Missouri River to the Des Moines River, then to the Mississippi River.  Slavery clauses, § 8, p. 548.
(2) Resolution providing for the admission of the state of Missouri into the Union, on a certain condition.
(3) Proclamation respecting the Admission of the State of Missouri into the Union.  The balance of Missouri Territory became unorganized; see Acts of 28 June 1834, 4 Stat. 701; 30 June 1834, 4 Stat. 729; 30 May 1854, 10 Stat. 277.
(4) An Act to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United States within the state of Missouri, and for the establishment of a district court therein.

Boundary change, to the Missouri River, Act of 7 June 1836, 5 Stat. 34.
Boundary with Arkansas, Act of 15 Feb. 1848, 9 Stat. 211.
Wikipedia, Missouri Compromise, John Hardeman Walker.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Missouri statehood, 8 May 1971 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC).
3 548 16/1 23 13 Mar. 1820 An Act in addition to an act, entitled “An act regulating the post-office establishment”.  Free franking.
3 548-553 16/1 24 14 Mar. 1820 An Act to provide for taking the fourth census, or enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States, and for other purposes.

Additional, 3 Mar. 1821, 3 Stat. 643.  Resolutions, 4 Feb. 1822, 3 Stat. 719; 30 Mar. 1822, 3 Stat. 719.
Apportionment, 7 Apr. 1820, 3 Stat. 555 (for Massachusetts and Maine); 7 Mar. 1822, 3 Stat. 651; 14 Jan. 1823, 3 Stat. 720 (for Alabama).

Wikipedia, 1820 United States census.
US Census Bureau, 1820 Census, Overview, Publications.   The census reference date was 7 Aug. 1820.
3 555-561 16/1 40 11 Apr. 1820 An Act making appropriations for the support of government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 559.
3 577-581 16/1 99 13 May 1820 An Act to alter and establish certain post-roads.
3 582 16/1 102 15 May 1820 An Act to limit the term of office of certain officers therein named, and for other purposes.  Beginning of the "spoils system"; the Post Office was not directly affected.
3 606-607 16/1 133 15 May 1820 An Act to provide for repairing the roof of the general post-office, and to procure an engine for the protection of said building.
3 623-628 16/2 33 3 Mar. 1821 An Act to alter and establish certain post-roads.
3 628-633 16/2 34 3 Mar. 1821 An Act making appropriations for the support of government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 631.
-- -- -- -- 27 Sep. 1821 Mexico declares independence of Spain.  US recognition, 12 Dec. 1822.
Constitution of the Republic of Mexico, 4 Oct. 1824 (ref).

State Dept., United States relations with Mexico, Chiefs of Mission.
Wikipedia, Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), Treaty of Córdoba (24 Aug. 1821), Declaration of Independence of the Mexican Empire (28 Sep. 1821), First Mexican Empire (1821-1823), First Mexican Republic (1824-1835), Centralist Republic of Mexico (1835-1846).
Federal Constitution of the United Mexican States, 1824, transcribed.

Commemorative postage stamp, Mexican Independence (1810), 16 Sep. 1960 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC).
3 649 17/1 1 19 Dec. 1821 An Act authorizing the transmission of certain documents free of postage.  Any documents ordered to be printed by Congress.
3 654-659 17/1 13 30 Mar. 1822 An Act for the establishment of a territorial government in Florida.  Florida Territory.  US laws, including the postal laws, to apply, § 9.

East Florida and West Florida were ceded by Spain, treaty signed 22 Feb. 1819, ratified 19 Feb. 1821, 8 Stat. 252.  West Florida had already been divided among Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, with the balance to this new Territory.

See also, Treaty of 27 Oct. 1795, 8 Stat. 138, Wikipedia; Convention of 11 Aug. 1802, 8 Stat. 198; Resolution and Acts of 1811 and 1812, 2 Stat. 666, 3 Stat. 471; Act of 3 Mar. 1819, 3 Stat. 523; Act of 3 Mar. 1821, 3 Stat. 637; Act of 3 Mar. 1823, 3 Stat. 750; Act of 26 May 1824, 4 Stat. 47; Act of 4 May 1826, 4 Stat. 157 [boundary with Georgia]; Act of 2 Mar. 1831, 4 Stat. 479; Act of 13 Apr. 1860, 12 Stat. 11; Act of 9 Apr. 1872, 17 Stat. 52.  See also, Carter, Territorial Papers, vol. 22, p. 5-8, etc. (link).
Notes, Acts passed relating to the territory of Florida, p. 523, p. 654-655; court decisions, land claims in Florida, p. 709-717.

Surrender of the Floridas by Spain, 10 and 17 July 1821, Laws of the United States of America, vol. 6, 1822, p. 638-641 (link); Donaldson, The Public Domain, 1884, p. 116-119 (link).

Wikipedia, Florida Territory.
Florida statehood, 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 742.
3 668-673 17/1 41 30 Apr. 1822 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-two, and for other purposes.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 671.  Postage expenses, fourth census, § 3, p. 673.
3 702-707 17/1 127 8 May 1822 An Act to establish certain post-roads, and to discontinue others, and for other purposes.
3 757-763 17/2 31 3 Mar. 1823 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-three.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 761.
3 764-768 17/2 33 3 Mar. 1823 An Act to discontinue certain post-roads and to establish others.  Steamboat waterways considered post roads, § 3.
3 779 17/2 54 3 Mar. 1823 An Act for clearing, repairing, and improving, certain roads for the purpose of facilitating the transportation of the United States' Mail.  Nashville to New Orleans.
3 784 17/2 63 3 Mar. 1823 An Act to authorize the Postmaster General to pay for certain repairs to the general post-office, and keep the engine house, the fire engine, and apparatus, in repair.

Public Resolutions, vol. 3, p. 1-790

Vol. Pages C/S No. Approved ... Title
3 248 13/3 7 1 Dec. 1814 Resolution, for furnishing the American Antiquarian Society with a copy of the journals of Congress, and of the documents published under their order.
See also, https://www.americanantiquarian.org/govdocs.htm
-- -- 14/1 -- 30 Mar. 1816 House Resolution, Committee on so much of the Public Accounts and Expenditures as relate to the Post Office, three members.
House Journal, 14th Congress, 1st session, 30 Mar. 1816, p. 550-552.
Continued to the 70th Congress, 1st session, dissolved by House Resolution 7, 5 Dec. 1927.
3
6
342
181-182
14/1 6 27 Apr. 1816 Resolution requiring the Secretary of State to compile and print, once in every two years, a register of all officers and agents, civil, military and naval in the services of the United States.
Often known as the Biennial Register, Blue Book, Official Register, or similar.
For full details of the publication and its postal information, 1816 to 1959, see here.
-- -- 14/2 -- 10 Dec. 1816 Senate Resolution, Committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, 5 members.
Senate Journal, 14th Congress, 2nd Session, 10 Dec. 1816, p. 38-39.
Transferred to the Committee on Civil Service, 1946.
3 474-475 15/1 7 19 Mar. 1818 Resolution authorizing the transportation of certain documents free of postage.  Message of the President, 14 Mar. 1818.
3 537 15/2 2 5 Dec. 1818 Resolution authorizing the transmission of certain documents free of postage.  Documents transmitted by the President or heads of departments, printed for the use of Congress.
3 537 15/2 5 15 Feb. 1819 Resolution authorizing the transmission of the documents accompanying the report of the committee to examine into the proceedings of the Bank of the United [States] free of postage.
3
538
15/2
6
3 Mar. 1819
Resolution directing the manner in which the printing of Congress shall be executed, fixing the prices thereof, and providing for the appointment of a printer or printers.  Each house elects its own printer; each at first chose Gales & Seaton.  This eventually led to the Superintendent of Public Printing, and the Government Printing Office.
The prices for printing were modified by Act of 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 764 § 2.
3 719 17/1 4 26 Apr. 1822 Resolution providing for the security in the transmission of letters, etc., in the public mails.  Imlay's copper cases for carrying letters to be tested.




[top; volume 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, etc.]
[previous, next]

US Statutes at Large, Volume 4, 1823-1835, published 1846, 1848, 1850, 1856, 1860

This volume contains acts of the Eighteenth through Twenty-third Congresses.
Public Acts and Resolutions in vol. 4, Private Acts and Resolutions in vol. 6.
Congress special sessions regular sessions Public Private Profiles
18th -- 1 Dec. 1823 – 27 May 1824
6 Dec. 1824 – 3 Mar. 1825
p. 1-78
p. 79-136
p. 290-319
p. 320-337
18th
19th 4 – 9 Mar. 1825 5 Dec. 1825 – 22 May 1826
4 Dec. 1826 – 3 Mar. 1827
p. 137-196
p. 197-245
p. 338-355
p. 356-369
19th
20th -- 3 Dec. 1827 – 26 May 1828
1 Dec. 1828 – 3 Mar. 1829
p. 246-322
p. 323-369
p. 370-394
p. 395-401
20th
21st 4 – 17 Mar. 1829 7 Dec. 1829 – 31 May 1830
6 Dec. 1830 – 3 Mar. 1831
p. 370-430
p. 431-495
p. 402-450
p. 451-470
21st
22nd -- 5 Dec. 1831 – 16 July 1832
3 Dec. 1832 – 2 Mar. 1833
p. 496-608
p. 609-669
p. 471-527
p. 528-552
22nd
23rd -- 2 Dec. 1833 – 30 June 1834
1 Dec. 1834 – 3 Mar. 1835
p. 670-745
p. 746-792
p. 553-603
p. 604-619
23rd
House Journal, Senate Journal, Senate Executive Journal, Annals of Congress (18th), Register of Debates, Congressional Globe (23rd)
    Serial Set, House Journal, (18) 92, 112; (19) 130, 147; (20) 168, 183; (21) 194, 205; (22) 215, 232; (23) 253, 270
    Serial Set, Senate Journal, (18) 88, 107; (19) 107, 124, 143; (20) 162, 180; (21) 180, 191, 202; (22) 211, 229; (23) 237, 265
    House Journal, 18/1, 18/2; 19/1, 19/2; 20/1, 20/2; 21/1, 21/2; 22/1, 22/2; 23/1, 23/2
    Senate Journal, 18/1, 18/2; 19/sp, 19/1, 19/2; 20/1, 20/2; 21/sp, 21/1, 21/2; 22/1, 22/2; 23/1, 23/2
    Senate Executive Journal, vol. 3, 18/1, 18/2; 19/sp, 19/1, 19/2; 20/1, 20/2; vol. 4, 21/sp, 21/1, 21/2; 22/1, 22/2; 23/1, 23/2

The 22nd Congress ended on the legislative day 2 Mar. 1833, at 5 am on the calendar day Sunday 3 Mar. 1833 (ref, col. 1938).  The discussion in the House at midnight of 3/4 Mar. 1835 is illuminating (ref, begin with Mr. Gilmer in col. 1658, and continue through col. 1663).
1846 1848 1850, as 1848
1856, as 1848
1860, noted by Checklist of United States Public Documents, 1911, p. 966 (ref)
Accumulated from the editions of 1846 and 1848, PDF

Public Acts, vol. 4, p. 1-792

Vol. Pages C/S Ch. Act of ... Title
4 11-17 18/1 32 2 Apr. 1824 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-four.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 14, 16.
4 22-23 18/1 46 30 Apr. 1824 An Act to procure the necessary surveys, plans and estimates, upon the subject of roads and canals.  "... or necessary for the transportation of the public mail; ...".

Wikipedia, General Survey Act.
4 41-43 18/1 157 26 May 1824 An Act authorizing the employment of additional clerks, and certain messengers and assistants, and other persons in the several departments.
4 85-91 18/2 13 25 Feb. 1825 An Act making appropriations for the support of government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-five.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 88.
4 95-100 18/2 46 3 Mar. 1825 An Act to establish certain post-roads, and to discontinue others.
4 102-114 18/2 64 3 Mar. 1825 An Act to reduce into one the several acts establishing and regulating the Post-office Department.  Only free white persons may carry the mails, § 7; repealed 3 Mar. 1865, 13 Stat. 515.  Ship letters, § 5-6, 15, 17-18, 34.  Free franking, § 27 (repealed 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 732 § 5), 28, 40.  Post Office employees exempt from militia duty and jury duty, § 35.  No stated effective date, but it is presumed to have been 1 May 1825.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1825Act.pdf
Notes, p. 102, 104, 108, 109.

An advertisement for proposals for carrying the mails, issued 1 Jan. 1857, quoted § 7 as "that no other than a free white male person shall be employed in carrying the mail" (ref).  Another advertisement, issued 15 Nov. 1864, quotes § 7 similarly, without "male".  Both were for routes in New England.
-- -- -- -- 26 Oct. 1825 The Erie Canal opened, from the Hudson River to Lake Erie.  Built by New York State, paid by tolls.

Wikipedia, Erie Canal.
4 139 19/1 8 3 Mar. 1826 An Act concerning the transportation of the mail between Vincennes and St. Louis.  Refers to the post road described in 3 Mar. 1821, 3 Stat. 627.
4 142-149 19/1 13 14 Mar. 1826 An Act making appropriations for the support of government, for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-six.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 145-146.
Note - LoC and LLoC substitute a second instance of p. 144 for p. 146.
4 154 19/1 27 20 Apr. 1826 An Act appropriating a sum of money for the repair of the post-roads between Jackson and Columbus in the state of Mississippi.
4 188 19/1 134 20 May 1826 An Act to allow the transportation of goods, wares, and merchandise, to and from Philadelphia and Baltimore, by the way of Lancaster and York, or by the mail-route.
4 190 19/1 139 20 May 1826 An Act appropriating a sum of money for the repair of the post-road from the Chatahoochie to Line Creek, in the state of Alabama.
4 208-214 19/2 23 2 Mar. 1827 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-seven.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 212.
4 221-226 19/2 37 2 Mar. 1827 An Act to establish sundry post-roads.
4 233-234 19/2 50 2 Mar. 1827 An Act in addition to "An act to regulate and fix the compensation of the clerks in the different offices”, passed [20] April, one thousand eight hundred and eighteen.  Postmaster General's office, § 5.
4 238-239 19/2 61 2 Mar. 1827 An Act amendatory of the act regulating the Post-office Department.  Free franking, § 4.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1827Act.pdf
4 239 19/2 62 2 Mar. 1827 An Act to increase the salary of the Postmaster General.
4 242 19/2 93 3 Mar. 1827 An Act to grant a certain quantity of land to the state of Ohio, for the purpose of making a road from Columbus to Sandusky.  No tolls to be charged to the mails.
4 247-253 20/1 6 12 Feb. 1828 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-eight.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 251; § 3, p. 253.
4 303 20/1 99 24 May 1828 An Act to authorize the Postmaster General to erect an additional building, and employ five additional clerks.
4 315-320 20/1 125 24 May 1828 An Act to establish sundry post-roads and to discontinue others.
4 323-329 20/2 1 9 Jan. 1829 An Act making appropriations for the support of government, for the first quarter of the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 327.
4 336-344 20/2 24 2 Mar. 1829 An Act making additional appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 341.
4 377-382 21/1 33 18 Mar. 1830 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 379.
4 383-389 21/1 40 23 Mar. 1830 An Act to provide for taking the fifth census or enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States.  Postage allowance (postage is reimbursed, not free), § 12, p. 388.

Additional, 3 Feb. 1831, 4 Stat. 439.  Resolutions, 3 July 1832, 4 Stat. 606; 13 July 1832, 4 Stat. 607.
Apportionment, 22 May 1832, 4 Stat. 516.

Wikipedia, 1830 United States census.
US Census Bureau, 1830 Census, Overview, Publications.   The census reference date was 1 June 1830.
4 407 21/1 107 26 May 1830 An Act for the distribution of certain books therein mentioned.  Free of postage, § 3.
4 411-412 21/1 148 28 May 1830 An Act to provide for an exchange of lands with the Indians residing in any of the states or territories, and for their removal west of the river Mississippi.
Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee [Creek], and Seminole nations relocated to present-day Oklahoma, 1830-1835, from Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, and Florida.

Wikipedia, Indian Removal Act.
Additional acts, 14 July 1832, 4 Stat. 595, etc.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Indian Centennial [of relocation], 15 Oct. 1948 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC).
4 414-416 21/1 153 29 May 1830 An Act to provide for the appointment of a solicitor of the treasury.  Free franking, § 11.
4 446-447 21/2 36 25 Feb. 1831 An Act to provide for the adjustment of claims of persons entitled to indemnification under the convention between the United States and his majesty the King of Denmark, of the twenty-eighth March, eighteen hundred and thirty, and for the distribution among such claimants of the sums to be paid by the Danish government to that of the United States according to the stipulation of the said convention.  Free franking, § 10.

The Convention, 28 Mar. 1830, 8 Stat. 402; Miller, Treaties, vol. 3, p. 531-540; Bevans, Treaties, vol. 7, p. 7-10.  Expired 28 Mar. 1833.
4 452-459 21/2 55 2 Mar. 1831 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 453, 456.
4 471 21/2 65 2 Mar. 1831 An Act making provision for a subscription to a compilation of Congressional documents.
This act refers to the series American State Papers, published in 1832-34, and 1858-61, ultimately in 38 volumes.  For the distribution and continuation, see the Resolutions of 10 July 1832, 4 Stat. 606, and 2 Mar. 1833, 4 Stat. 669, and the Act of 12 June 1858, 11 Stat. 319 § 19.  For the individual volumes and some further notes, see here.
4 483-486 21/2 97 2 Mar. 1831 An act declaring the assent of Congress to an act of the general assembly of the state of Ohio, hereinafter recited.  No tolls to be charged to the mails, along the Cumberland Road.
4 505 22/1 70 20 Apr. 1832 An Act authorizing the governor of the territory of Arkansas to lease the salt springs, in said territory, and for other purposes.  Hot Springs aside as a federal reserve, § 3.
4 506-514 22/1 74 5 May 1832 An Act making appropriations for the support of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 507, 510.
4 534-549 22/1 141 15 June 1832 An Act to establish certain post-roads, and to alter and discontinue others; and for other purposes.
4 564 22/1 174 9 July 1832 An Act to provide for the appointment of a commissioner of Indian Affairs, and for other purposes.  Free franking, § 3.
4 574-576 22/1 199 13 July 1832 An Act to carry into effect the convention between the United States and his majesty the King of the French concluded at Paris on the fourth of July, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-one.  Free franking, § 8.
Convention, 8 Stat. 430, signed 4 July 1831, proclamation 13 July 1832.
4 579 22/1 221 14 July 1832 An Act to increase and improve the law department of the library of Congress.
4 618 22/2 41 20 Feb. 1833 An Act to authorize the laying out and constructing a road from Line Creek to the Chatahooche, and for repairing the road on which the mail is now transported.
4 619-629 22/2 54 2 Mar. 1833 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 619, 623.  Free franking, § 1, p. 622 (Commissioner of Pensions); § 6, p. 629 (Congress).
4 655-659 22/2 79 2 Mar. 1833 An Act declaring the assent of Congress to an act of the General Assembly of the State of Virginia, hereinafter recited.  No tolls to be charged to the mails, along the Cumberland Road.
See also, Annual Report of the Postmaster General, 1841 (link).
4 666-667 22/2 96 2 Mar. 1833 An Act to carry into effect the convention between the United States and his majesty the king of the Two Sicilies, concluded at Naples on the fourteenth day of October, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-two.  Free franking, § 8.
4 689-699 23/1 92 27 June 1834 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-four.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 689, 693.
4 701 23/1 98 28 June 1834 An Act to attach the territory of the United States west of the Mississippi river, and north of the state of Missouri, to the territory of Michigan.  Formerly part of Missouri Territory, but now unorganized; later, Iowa, Minnesota, Dakota east of the Missouri and White Earth Rivers, north to the US border.
The balance of former Missouri Territory became Kansas and Nebraska Territories, Act of 30 May 1854, 10 Stat. 277.
4 708-711 23/1 126 28 June 1834 An Act giving the consent of Congress to an agreement or compact entered into between the state of New York and the state of New Jersey, respecting the territorial limits and jurisdiction of said states.
4 712 23/1 129 30 June 1834 An Act to enable the Secretary of State to purchase the papers and books of General Washington.
4 729-735 23/1 161 30 June 1834 An Act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers.  "That all that part of the United States west of the Mississippi, and not within the states of Missouri and Louisiana, or the territory of Arkansas" is designated the Indian country, by § 1.  The term Indian Territory is not used.  This was now an unorganized unincorporated territory, although judicial districts were assigned to Missouri and Arkansas Territory by § 24.  Later greatly reduced in size, and incorporated into Oklahoma.
Earlier boundary designations, see Act of 19 May 1796, 1 Stat. 469.
Wikipedia, Nonintercourse Act.
4 735-738 23/1 162 30 June 1834 An Act to provide for the organization of the department of Indian affairs.  Within the War Dept.  A continuation of Ch. 161.
4 740-741 23/1 168 30 June 1834 An Act authorizing the governors of the several states to transmit, by mail, certain books and documents.  Free franking.
4 760-771 23/2 30 3 Mar. 1835 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 761, 764-765.
4 779 23/2 46 3 Mar. 1835 An Act to continue the office of commissioner of pensions.  Free franking, § 3.
Public Resolutions, vol. 4, p. 1-792

Vol. Pages C/S No. Approved ... Title
4 194 19/1 1 4 May 1826 Resolution directing a survey of certain routes between Baltimore and Philadelphia for a post-road.
4 320 20/1 1 3 Apr. 1828 Resolution authorizing the Speaker of the House of Representatives to frank letters and packages.
4 320 20/1 3 23 May 1828 Resolution in relation to Charles Carroll, of Carrollton.  Free franking.  The only surviving signer of the Declaration of Independence.
4 322 20/1 6 24 May 1828 Resolution in relation to the mail-route between the cities of New Orleans and Mobile.
4 429 21/1 3 30 Apr. 1830 A Resolution authorizing the transmission of papers, by mail, relating to the fifth census.  Weight limit removed.
4 430 21/1 4 28 May 1830 Resolution for obtaining the aggregate returns of former enumerations of the population of the United States.  Census, first through fourth.
4 495 21/2 1 13 Jan. 1831 Resolution in relation to the transmission [free of postage] of public documents printed by order of either House of Congress.  The Act of 3 Mar. 1825 (4 Stat. 102) does not negate the Act of 19 Dec. 1821 (3 Stat. 649).
4 606-607 22/1 6 10 July 1832 Resolution directing the distribution of a compilation of congressional documents, and for other purposes.
4 608 22/1 10 14 July 1832 Resolution directing the transmission of the fifth census by mail.  Free of postage.
4 608 22/1 11 14 July 1832 Resolution respecting the Biennial Register.
4 744 23/1 2 19 June 1834 Resolution for distributing returns of the last census.




[top; volume 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, etc.]
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US Statutes at Large, Volume 5, 1835-1845, published 1846, 1850, 1853, 1856, 1860

This volume contains acts of the Twenty-fourth through Twenty-eighth Congresses.

Wisconsin was organized as a Territory, 20 Apr. 1836, "from and after" 3 July 1836, 5 Stat. 10; the Iowa Territory was separated from it, 12 June 1838, "from and after" 3 July 1838, 5 Stat. 235.

Arkansas was admitted to the Union, 15 June 1836, 5 Stat. 50; Michigan, 26 Jan. 1837, 5 Stat. 144; Iowa and Florida, 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 742.

Texas declared its independence of Mexico, 2 Mar. 1836 (ref), and was annexed by the US, 1 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 797.
Public Acts and Resolutions in vol. 5, Private Acts and Resolutions in vol. 6.
Congress special sessions regular sessions Public Private Profiles
24th -- 7 Dec. 1835 – 4 July 1836
5 Dec. 1836 – 3 Mar. 1837
p. 1-134
p. 135-200
p. 620-683
p. 684-700
24th
25th 4 – 10 Mar. 1837 4 Sep. 1837 – 16 Oct. 1837
4 Dec. 1837 – 9 July 1838
3 Dec. 1838 – 3 Mar. 1839
p. 201-207
p. 208-311
p. 312-366
p. 701
p. 702-744
p. 745-795
25th
26th -- 2 Dec. 1839 – 21 July 1840
7 Dec. 1840 – 3 Mar. 1841
p. 367-409
p. 410-436
p. 796-817
p. 818-824
26th
27th 4 – 15 Mar. 1841 31 May 1841 – 13 Sep. 1841
6 Dec. 1841 – 31 Aug. 1842
5 Dec. 1842 – 3 Mar. 1843
p. 437-468
p. 469-585
p. 586-650
p. 825
p. 826-877
p. 878-907
27th
28th -- 4 Dec. 1843 – 17 June 1844
2 Dec. 1844 – 3 Mar. 1845
p. 651-720
p. 721-801
p. 908-933
p. 934-942
28th
House Journal, Senate Journal, Senate Executive Journal, Register of Debates (24th-25th), Congressional Globe
    Serial Set, House Journal, (24) 285, 300; (25) 310, 320, 343; (26) 362, 381; (27) 391, 400, 417; (28) 438, 462
    Serial Set, Senate Journal, (24) 278, 296; (25) 296, 308, 313, 337; (26) 353, 374; (27) 374, 389, 394, 412; (29) 430, 448
    House Journal, 24/1, 24/2; 25/1, 25/2, 25/3; 26/1, 26/2; 27/1, 27/2, 27/3; 28/1, 28/2
    Senate Journal, 24/1, 24/2; 25/sp, 25/1, 25/2, 25/3; 26/1, 26/2; 27/sp, 27/1, 27/2, 27/3; 28/1, 28/2
    Senate Executive Journal, vol. 4, 24/1, 24/2; vol. 5, 25/sp, 25/1, 25/2, 25/3; 26/1, 26/2; 27/sp, 27/1, vol. 6, 27/2, 27/3; 28/1, 28/2
1846 1850 1853, as 1850
1856, as 1853
1860, as 1853
Accumulated from the editions of 1846, 1850, 1853, and 1856, PDF

Public Acts, vol. 5, p. 1-801

Vol. Pages C/S Ch. Act of ... Title
-- -- -- -- 2 Mar. 1836 Texas Declaration of Independence (ref).
The Provisional Constitution of Texas, 13 Nov. 1835, Art. III, authorized a postal system (ref); the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, 17 Mar. 1836, similarly in Art. II Sec. 3 (ref).
The boundaries of Texas were enacted 19 Dec. 1836 (link): from the Sabine River (and thus the 1819 treaty line agreed by Spain) to the Rio Grande, to the source of the Rio Grande, to 42° N (again, the 1819 treaty line).

By the Constitution of the Mexican State of Coahuila and Texas, 11 Mar. 1827 (ref), slavery was prohibited.  Mexico abolished slavery by decree in 1829 (ref), though it was not made effective in Texas (ref).  Slavery was permitted under the Texas Constitution (ref).
Wikipedia, History of slavery in Texas.
Constitution of the State of Coahuila and Texas [Mexico], 1827, transcribed.
Constitution of the Republic of Texas, 1836, transcribed.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Texas independence, 2 Mar. 1936 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 9 May 1936 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC); Republic of Texas, 2 Mar. 1986 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
5 9 24/1 52 14 Apr. 1836 An Act making appropriations for the payment of the revolutionary and other pensioners of the United States, for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six.  Payments to the Post Office, § 2; repealed, 13 Aug. 1841, 5 Stat. 439 § 4.
5 10-16 24/1 54 20 Apr. 1836 An Act establishing the Territorial Government of Wisconsin.  From Michigan Territory, with part of the former Missouri Territory, present Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and part of North and South Dakota, as far west as the Missouri and White Earth Rivers.  Effective "from and after" 3 July 1836.
Wisconsin Territory was decreased by the formation of Iowa Territory (1838), with the balance after statehood to Minnesota Territory (1849).

Map, Historical diagram of Indiana, Michigan [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Wisconsin Territory.
Wisconsin statehood, 29 May 1848, 9 Stat. 56, 9 Stat. 233.

Commemorative postal card -- Wisconsin Territory, 3 July 1986 (MSC).
5 17-25 24/1 59 9 May 1836 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-six.  Postmaster General's office, § 1, p. 17, 20.  Annual report, § 2, p. 25.
5 34 24/1 86 7 June 1836 An Act to extend the western boundary of the State of Missouri to the Missouri River.  At the northwest corner of the state, from Indian country by purchase.

Treaty with the Ioway, Sac and Fox, 17 Sep. 1836, 7 Stat. 511.  Proclamation, 28 Mar. 1837, 5 Stat. 802.

Wikipedia, Platte Purchase.
5 34-36 24/1 87 7 June 1836 An Act to carry into effect a convention between the United States and Spain.  Free franking, § 8.
5
5
5
5
49-50
56-57
61-62
144
24/1
24/1
24/1
24/2
99
117
234
6
15 June 1836
23 June 1836
1 July 1836
26 Jan. 1837
(1) An Act to establish the northern boundary line of the State of Ohio, and to provide for the admission of the State of Michigan into the Union upon the conditions therein expressed.  The boundary dispute between Ohio and Michigan Territory was resolved in Ohio's favor.  The upper peninsula, between Lake Michigan and Lake Superior, was added to Michigan Territory in compensation; its boundary with Wisconsin Territory to be marked, 5 Stat. 244.
(2) An Act to settle and establish the northern boundary line of the State of Ohio.  Northern boundary lines of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois.  Supplementary act, 5 Stat. 59.
(3) An Act to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United States within the State of Michigan.
(4) An Act to admit the State of Michigan into the Union, upon an equal footing with the original States.

Wikipedia, Toledo War.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Michigan statehood, 1 Nov. 1935 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST), 9 May 1936 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 26 Jan. 1987 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
5 50-52 24/1 100 15 June 1836 An Act for the admission of the State of Arkansas into the Union, and to provide for the due execution of the laws of the United States, within the same, and for other purposes.
Supplementary acts, 23 June 1836, 5 Stat. 58; 29 July 1846, 9 Stat. 42.  Boundary with Texas, Act of 15 June 1844, 5 Stat. 674.  Boundary with Missouri, Act of 15 Feb. 1848, 9 Stat. 211.  Boundary with Indian country, Act of 3 Mar. 1875, 18 Stat. 476.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Arkansas statehood, 15 June 1936 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 3 Jan. 1986 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
5 52-56 24/1 115 23 June 1836 An Act to regulate the deposites of the public money.  Payments, § 5.

Not having a national bank, the Secretary of the Treasury was to select at least one bank in each state and territory for deposit of US public funds.
Wikipedia, Panic of 1837.
5
6
9
9
64
892e
102-106
115
24/1
27/3
29/1
29/1
252
122
178
23
1 July 1836
3 Mar. 1843
10 Aug. 1846
10 Aug. 1846
(1) An Act to authorize and enable the President to assert and prosecute with effect, the claim of the United States to the legacy bequeathed to them by James Smithson, late of London, deceased, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
(2) An Act for the relief of Richard Rush.  For transport of Smithsonian funds.
(3) An Act to establish the "Smithsonian Institution," for the Increase and Diffusion of Knowledge among Men.
(4) A Resolution appointing Regents of the Smithsonian Institution.

Pres. Jackson, message to Congress, 17 Dec. 1835 (ref); Pres. Van Buren, message of 6 Dec. 1838 (ref).

Commemorative postage stamps -- Smithsonian Institution, 10 Aug. 1946 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 7 Feb. 1996 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).  The Smithsonian National Postal Museum opened 30 July 1993 (museum website, NPM, NPM, NPM, NPM, NPMA).
5 80-90 24/1 270 2 July 1836 An Act to change the organization of the Post Office Department, and to provide more effectually for the settlement of the accounts thereof.  Auditor of the Treasury for the Post Office Department [Sixth Auditor], § 8, 10, 14, etc.; see also 16 Stat. 162 § 7.  Third Asst. Postmaster General, § 20.  Free franking, § 8, 20, 36.  Penalty for detaining letters, § 32.  Post Office employees exempt from militia duty and jury duty, § 34.  Express mail, § 39.  Letter carriers and fees, § 41.
§ 24-25, partly repealed by 13 Stat. 184 § 6.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1836Act.pdf

§ 32 was a response to the abolitionist mail being sent to Southern post offices.
The Express Mail service from New York to New Orleans began 15 Nov. 1836.
5 90-107 24/1 271 2 July 1836 An Act to establish certain post roads, and to alter and discontinue others, and for other purposes.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1836Post.pdf
5 107 24/1 290 2 July 1836 An Act to extend the privilege of franking letters and packages to Dolly P. Madison.  Widow of Pres. James Madison.  See also, Act of 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 732 § 23.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Dolley Madison, 20 May 1980 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
5 107-112 24/1 352 4 July 1836 An Act to reorganize the General Land Office.  Hours open, including the General Post Office, § 12, p. 112.
5 112-115 24/1 353 4 July 1836 An Act in addition to the act entitled "An act making appropriations, in part, for the support of Government, for the year eighteen hundred and thirty-six", and for other purposes.  Post Office Dept. compensation, § 4.

The act cited in the title is 11 Feb. 1836, 5 Stat. 2, which has no postal relevance.
5 117-125 24/1 357 4 July 1836 An Act to promote the progress of useful arts, and to repeal all acts and parts of acts heretofore made for that purpose.  Patent Office, now in the State Dept.  Free franking, § 1.
5 163-176 24/2 33 3 Mar. 1837 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the year eighteen hundred and thirty-seven.  Post Office, § 1, p. 163, 167, 171, 174, 175.
5 187 24/2 43 3 Mar. 1837 An Act to continue the office of Commissioner of Pensions.  Free franking, § 3.
5 216-223 25/2 54 6 Apr. 1838 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the year eighteen hundred and thirty-eight.  Post Office, § 1, p. 216, 219-220, 223.
5 235-241 25/2 96 12 June 1838 An Act to divide the Territory of Wisconsin and to establish the Territorial Government of Iowa.  Iowa Territory; the part of Wisconsin Territory west of the Mississippi River, to the Missouri River, north to Canada, south to Missouri.  Effective "from and after" 3 July 1838.
Eastern boundary of Iowa, 3 Mar. 1839, 5 Stat. 357.
Southern boundary of Iowa (with Missouri), 18 June 1838, 5 Stat. 248; 4 Aug. 1846, 9 Stat. 52; 1837-1846, see Donaldson, The Public Domain, 1884, p. 437-439 (link).
Eastern boundary of Wisconsin (with Michigan), 12 June 1838, 5 Stat. 244.
After statehood (1846) the balance of Iowa Territory joined Minnesota Territory (1849).

Map, Historical diagram of Missouri, Michigan [Van Zandt].
Wikipedia, Iowa Territory.
Iowa statehood, 28 Dec. 1846, 9 Stat. 52, 9 Stat. 117; the admission act of 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 742, did not take effect.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Iowa Territory, 24 Aug. 1938 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC, WC); postal card, 2 July 1988 (MSC).
5 255 25/2 158 5 July 1838 An Act to modify the last clause of the fifth section of the deposite act of the twenty-third of June, eighteen hundred and thirty-six.  Payments.
5 256-260 25/2 162 5 July 1838 An Act to increase the present military establishment of the United States, and for other purposes.  Free franking, § 21, p. 259.
5 264-267 25/2 169 7 July 1838 An Act to provide for the support of the Military Academy of the United States for the year eighteen hundred and thirty-eight, and for other purposes.  Post Office, § 4, p. 265.  Mail route, § 5, p. 266.
5 271-283 25/2 172 7 July 1838 An Act to establish certain post routes and to discontinue others.  Every railroad a post road, § 2, p. 283.
5 314 25/3 4 25 Jan. 1839 An Act further to regulate the transportation of the mail upon railroads.
5 318-319 25/3 30 20 Feb. 1839 An Act to prohibit the giving or accepting, within the District of Columbia, of a challenge to fight a duel, and for the punishment thereof.
Following the fatal duel of two Congressmen in 1838 (ref).

Wikipedia, Jonathan Cilley.
5 331-337 25/3 80 3 Mar. 1839 An Act to provide for taking the sixth census or enumeration of the inhabitants of the United States.  Postage allowance (postage is reimbursed, not free), § 12, p. 336.

Additional, 26 Feb. 1840, 5 Stat. 368 (postage, § 7, p. 369); 14 Jan. 1841, 5 Stat. 411; 1 Sep. 1841, 5 Stat. 452; 1 Sep. 1841, 5 Stat. 467.  Resolutions, 15 Apr. 1842, 5 Stat. 583; 24 Feb. 1843, 5 Stat. 648.
Apportionment, 25 June 1842, 5 Stat. 491.

Wikipedia, 1840 United States census.
US Census Bureau, 1840 Census, Overview, Publications.   The census reference date was 1 June 1840.
5 339-349 25/3 82 3 Mar. 1839 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the year eighteen hundred and thirty-nine.  Post Office, § 1, p. 339, 342-343, 348.
5
6
353
816
25/3
26/1
87
2
3 Mar. 1839
16 May 1840
(1) An Act providing for the erection of a fire-proof building for the use of the General Post Office Department.
(2) Joint Resolution for the relief of Masterton and Smith, and for other purposes.  Building contractors.
5 369-370 26/1 4 4 Mar. 1840 An Act to continue the office of commissioner of Pensions, and to transfer the pension business, heretofore transacted in the Navy Department, to that office.  Free franking, § 3.
-- -- -- -- 6 May 1840 Postage stamps valid for use in Britain, at uniform domestic rates.
5 371-380 26/1 22 8 May 1840 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the Government for the year eighteen hundred and forty.  Post Office, § 1, p. 371, 374, 378, 379-380.
5 383-384 26/1 34 12 June 1840 An Act to carry into effect a convention between the United States and the Mexican Republic.  Free franking, § 5.
5
5
385-392
439-440
26/1
27/1
41
7
4 July 1840
13 Aug. 1841
(1) An Act to provide for the collection, safe keeping, transfer, and disbursement of the public revenue.  Payments, § 9-11, p. 387-388; § 19-20, p. 390.
(2) An Act to repeal the act entitled “An act to provide for the collection, safe-keeping, transfer, and disbursement of the public revenue,” and to provide for the punishment of embezzlers of public money, and for other purposes.  Post Office, § 2, 4.

Wikipedia, Independent Treasury.
5 421-433 26/2 35 3 Mar. 1841 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the Government for the year eighteen hundred and forty-one.  Post Office, § 1, p. 421, 424-425, 429, 430-431.
5 453-458 27/1 16 4 Sep. 1841 An Act to appropriate the proceeds of the sales of the public lands, and to grant pre-emption rights.  Mails on roads built with the proceeds, § 9, p. 455.
5 461 27/1 19 9 Sep. 1841 An Act authorizing the transmission of letters and packets to and from Mrs. Harrison, free of postage.  Anna Harrison, widow of Pres. William Henry Harrison.  See also, 30 June 1841, 5 Stat. 437; 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 732 § 23.
5 461 27/1 20 9 Sep. 1841 An Act to make appropriations for the Post Office Department.
5 473 27/2 23 14 Apr. 1842 An Act to establish certain post roads.
5 475-488 27/2 29 18 May 1842 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the year eighteen hundred and forty-two.  Post Office, § 1, p. 478, 479, 487-488.
5 498 27/2 107 30 July 1842 An Act to provide for the permanent employment in the Post Office Department of certain clerks heretofore for several years temporarily employed in that Department.
5 523-533 27/2 202 26 Aug. 1842 An Act legalizing and making appropriations for such necessary objects as have been usually included in the general appropriation bills without authority of law, and to fix and provide for certain incidental expenses of the Departments and offices of the Government, and for other purposes.  Post Office, § 11, 17-18, 22, p. 525, 526-527, 531, 532.
5 536-537 27/2 207 26 Aug. 1842 An Act to define and establish the fiscal year of the Treasury of the United States.  Commencing 1 July 1843.
5 538 27/2 255 29 Aug. 1842 An Act to provide for the publication of a new edition of the laws and regulations of the Post Office Department, and a perfect list of the post-offices in the United States.
5 568-575 27/2 274 31 Aug. 1842 An Act [to] establish certain post roads.  § 2, effective 1 July 1843.
5 579-581 27/2 286 31 Aug. 1842 An Act to reorganize the Navy Department of the United States.  Free franking, § 7.
5 586-597 27/3 2 24 Dec. 1842 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the half calendar year ending the thirtieth day of June, eighteen hundred and forty-three.  Post Office, § 1, p. 590-591.
5 597 27/3 4 20 Jan. 1843 An Act to continue the office of Commissioner of Pensions.  Free franking, § 3.
Office continued to 4 Mar. 1849, 14 Jan. 1846, 9 Stat. 3; further, 19 Jan. 1849, 9 Stat. 341.
5 600 27/3 31 15 Feb. 1843 An Act to authorize the chief clerk in the office of the Secretary of State to frank public and official documents sent from that office.
5 618-619 27/3 84 3 Mar. 1843 An Act to test the practicability of establishing a system of electro-magnetic telegraphs by the United States.  Appropriation to Samuel F.B. Morse.

Morse demonstrated his telegraph to Congress in Feb. 1838.  This act funded a line from Washington to Baltimore; the first official messages were sent 1 May 1844, from Annapolis to Washington, and 24 May 1844, from Washington to Baltimore.  (ref)
5 630-645 27/3 100 3 Mar. 1843 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the fiscal year ending the thirtieth day of June, eighteen hundred and forty-four.  Transmission of letters between Chagres and Panama, § 1, p. 643.  Post Office Department, § 1, p. 637, 643-644.
5 668 28/1 62 15 June 1844 An Act making appropriations for the service of the Post Office Department, for the fiscal year ending thirtieth June, eighteen hundred and forty-five.
5 669 28/1 65 15 June 1844 An Act to establish certain post roads in the Territory of Florida.
5 681-696 28/1 105 17 June 1844 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of Government for the fiscal year ending the thirtieth day of June, eighteen hundred and forty-five, and for other purposes.  Post Office, § 1, p. 687.
5 732-739 28/2 43 3 Mar. 1845 An Act to reduce the rates of postage, to limit the use and correct the abuse of the franking privilege, and for the prevention of frauds on the revenues of the Post Office Department.  Postage rates and free franking, § 1; newspapers, § 2; printed matter, § 3; letter mail transport, § 4; all previous acts regarding free franking, repealed, § 5; accounting and free franking, § 6, 7, 8; private express companies not permitted to carry letters on post roads, § 9; or outside the mails, § 10, 11, 12; steamboat mail, § 13, 14; "mailable matter" defined, § 15; "newspaper" defined, § 16; penalties, § 17; contracts, advertised letters, § 18; railroads, § 19; court jurisdiction, § 20; appropriations to guard against deficiencies in revenue, § 21, 22; free franking for president, ex-presidents and the widows of Presidents Madison and Harrison, § 23.

https://www.rfrajola.com/resources/1845Act.pdf
Transcribed, https://www.jcampbell.com/docs-ref/us/184503_law.pdf

Effective 1 July 1845, by Resolution of same date, 5 Stat. 800.  "By an oversight, some of the prohibitions and penalties had been left in the bill so stated as to go into effect immediately."  [The Baltimore Directory, for 1845, Apr. 1845, p. 173 (link)]  For example, § 1, "from and after the first day of July next", but § 6, "from and after the passage of this act".  The resolution says "on and after the first day of July next, and not sooner".

Summaries of the new law appeared in various newspapers and legal journals; for example, The Western Law Journal, July 1845 (ref).  The summary from the New York Courier includes a section (16) actually from 5 Stat. 748 § 5, "Forging, or uttering stamps, provided for in this law, is declared to be felony, ...".

This act put an end to the Independent Mails, private companies such as the American Letter Mail Co., and Hale & Co., who were in direct competition with the Post Office since Dec. 1843.
5 739-740 28/2 44 3 Mar. 1845 An Act making appropriations for the service of the Post Office Department, for the year ending thirtieth June, eighteen hundred and forty-six.
5
5
5
742-743
788
789-790
28/2
28/2
28/2
48
75
76
3 Mar. 1845
3 Mar. 1845
3 Mar. 1845
(1) An Act for the admission of the States of Iowa and Florida into the Union.  Boundaries of Iowa, § 2; contingent on assent by vote, § 4, but it was defeated.  Boundaries of Florida, § 5.
(2) An Act supplemental to the act for the admission of Florida and Iowa into the Union, and for other purposes.  US laws in effect in Florida.
(3) An Act supplemental to the act for the admission of the States of Iowa and Florida into the Union.  US laws in effect in Iowa.

For Iowa statehood, see Acts of 4 Aug. 1846, 9 Stat. 52, and 28 Dec. 1846, 9 Stat. 117; the admission act of 3 Mar. 1845, 5 Stat. 742, did not take effect.

Commemorative postage stamps. Florida statehood, 3 Mar. 1945 (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC), 3 Mar. 1995 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
5 748-750 28/2 69 3 Mar. 1845 An Act to provide for the transportation of the mail between the United States and foreign countries, and for other purposes.  Contracts, § 1, 2, 7, 8; rates of postage, § 3; no private carriage of mail on contracted ships, § 4; penalty for counterfeit stamps [postal markings], § 5; postage paid by consuls, § 6.
See also, appropriations, 2 Mar. 1847, 9 Stat. 152; 3 Mar. 1847, 9 Stat. 188 § 8; 10 July 1848, 9 Stat. 245.
5 752-765 28/2 71 3 Mar. 1845 An Act making appropriations for the civil and diplomatic expenses of the Government for the year ending the thirtieth June, eighteen hundred and forty-six, and for other purposes.  Post Office, § 1, p. 757 (Post Office Dept. building; magnetic telegraph from Washington to Baltimore); § 8, p. 765 (postage of the Executive Departments).

Former Postmaster General Amos Kendall formed the Magnetic Telegraph Company; it opened a line from Washington to New York in 1846.
5 778-787 28/2 74 3 Mar. 1845 An Act to establish certain post routes.
5 790-795 28/2 77 3 Mar. 1845 An Act making appropriations for the naval service for the year ending the thirtieth June, eighteen hundred and forty-six.  Contract proposals [by any executive department or bureau] to be advertised, § 12.
Public Resolutions, vol. 5, p. 1-801

Vol. Pages C/S No. Approved ... Title
5 131 24/1 2 19 Mar. 1836 Resolution to establish certain post roads in Missouri and Arkansas.
5 132 24/1 4 14 May 1836 A Resolution to change the time of making contracts for the transportation of the mail.  Contracts to begin July 1 instead of Jan. 1.
5 198-199 24/2 1 2 Mar. 1837 A Resolution to enable the Postmaster General more readily to change the commencement of the contract year in the Post Office Department.
5 207 25/1 1 12 Oct. 1837 A Resolution directing the postage on letters sent by the Express Mail to be paid in advance.
5 310 25/2 1 19 Mar. 1838 Joint Resolution, authorizing the Commissioner of the Public Buildings to cause the removal of the walls of the late Post Office Building.
-- -- -- -- 23 June 1840 House Resolutions, requesting a detailed report on Post Roads.  House Journal, vol. 34, p. 1143 (link).
Funding by Act of 21 July 1840, 6 Stat. 816, § 13.
5 583 27/2 5 1 June 1842 A Resolution to authorize the extension of the contract for carrying the mail on the route between Mobile and New Orleans.
5 585 27/2 14 31 Aug. 1842 A Resolution to authorize an extension of a contract for carrying the mail.
5 718-719 28/1 14 15 June 1844 A Joint Resolution in relation to the transmission of the British mail between Boston and Canada, and for other purposes.  Mails to France and Germany via Havre and Bremen, to be arranged.
5 796 28/2 4 20 Feb. 1845 Joint Resolution authorizing the Postmaster General of the United States to contract with railroad companies, in certain cases, without advertising for proposals therefor.
5 797-798 28/2 8 1 Mar. 1845 Joint Resolution for annexing Texas to the United States.  Conditions to be met by 1 Jan. 1846.  Accepted by the Texas Convention, 4 July 1845 (ref).  Annexed and admitted 29 Dec. 1845, 9 Stat. 1, 9 Stat. 108; Mexico took this as a hostile act, leading to war in 1846.

Miller, Treaties, vol. 4, p. 689-739, with many more documents and extensive notes.

The proposed treaty of 12 Apr. 1844, for the annexation of Texas, was not ratified by the Senate (ref, ref, ref).
5 798-800 28/2 10 3 Mar. 1845 A Resolution to authorize the Attorney General to contract for copies of a proposed edition of the Laws and Treaties of the United States.  Little & Brown.
5 800 28/2 13 3 Mar. 1845 Joint Resolution to fix the time when the act to reduce the rates of postage, to limit the use and correct the abuse of the franking privilege, and for the prevention of frauds on the revenues of the Post Office Department, passed at this session, shall go into effect.  1 July 1845.




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US Statutes at Large, Volume 6, Private Acts, 1789-1845, published 1846, 1848, 1853, 1856, 1862

1846 1848
1853, as 1848 1856, noted by Checklist of United States Public Documents, 1911, p. 966 (ref)
1862, as 1848
Accumulated from the editions of 1846 and 1862, PDF
Note - "surety" refers to a person who provided a financial guarantee for a government appointee or contractor, much as a bonding agency would do today.


Private Acts, vol. 6, p. 1-942

Vol. Pages C/S Ch. Act of ... Title
-- -- -- -- 1790 Isaac Trowbridge, mail contract, New York to Hartford.  Journal of the House, 12, 15 Feb. 1790; 17 Mar. 1790.  Report of the Postmaster General, not printed.
6 3a 1/2 24 1 July 1790 An Act for the relief of Nathaniel Twining.  Mail carrier.
6 40b 6/1 18 3 Apr. 1800 An Act to extend the privilege of franking letters and packages to Martha Washington.
6 71a 10/1 23 25 Feb. 1808 An Act for the relief of Samuel Whiting.  Theft by postmaster.
Report of the Postmaster General, 8 Jan. 1808, American State Papers, Part IX, Claims, vol. 36, p. 355 (link).
6 103b 12/1 7 12 Dec. 1811 An Act for the relief of Josiah H. Webb.  Wounded mail carrier.
See also, Act of 21 Apr. 1806, 2 Stat. 408 § 3.
6 119a 12/2 59 3 Mar. 1813 An Act for the relief of Susannah Wiley.  Widow of surveyor.
6 144a 13/2 90 18 Apr. 1814 An Act for the relief of John D. Hay.  Postmaster.
6 184c 14/2 11 8 Feb. 1817 An Act for the relief of Henry Malcolm.  Money lost in the mail.
6 201c 15/1 28 3 Apr. 1818 An Act for the relief of Abraham Byington.  Surety.
6 245c 16/1 71 8 May 1820 An Act for the relief of the widow of John Heaps, deceased.  Mail carrier, murdered by ruffians.
6 272-273 17/1 85 7 May 1822 An Act for the relief of John Post and Farly Fuller.  Surety.
6 285a 17/2 86 3 Mar. 1823 An Act for the discharge of John Burgin from imprisonment.  Surety.
6 290b 18/1 5 7 Jan. 1824 An Act for the relief of Thomas W. Bacot.  Postmaster.
6 300d 18/1 76 17 May 1824 An Act for the relief of Henry Lightner.  Postmaster.
6 301c 18/1 81 17 May 1824 An Act for the relief of Elliott Rucker.  Surety.
6 333b 18/2 87 3 Mar. 1825 An Act for the relief of James Porter and Tunstall Quarles.  Surety.
6 333-334 18/2 90 3 Mar. 1825 An Act for the relief of John Heck.  Surety.
6 345b 19/1 84 20 May 1826 An Act for the relief of John Donly.  Mail carrier.
See also, American State Papers, Post Office Department, No. 60, 13 Mar. 1826, Extra Allowance made to a Mail Contractor (link).
6
6
6
347b
378a
517c
19/1
20/1
22/1
96
62
266
20 May 1826
19 May 1828
14 July 1832
(1) An Act for the relief of Rebecca Blodget.
(2) An Act granting compensation to Rebecca Blodget, for her right of dower in the property therein mentioned.
(3) An Act for the relief of Rebecca Blodget, widow of Samuel Blodget, deceased.

At issue was the land and building purchased in 1810 for the General Post Office and the Patent Office under 2 Stat. 589.  Samuel Blodget purchased the land in 1792, and (partly) built a hotel using proceeds from a lottery; the lottery winner sued and claimed ownership, and later sold the still-unfinished building to the government.  When completed in 1812, the building housed the General Post Office, the Patent Office, and the Washington City Post Office.  Samuel Blodget's widow, Rebecca Blodget, claimed and won the right to payment from the Post Office.  The building was destroyed by fire in 1836; see 5 Stat. 310, 5 Stat. 353.

Samuel Blodget (1757-1814); Dictionary of American Biography, 1929, vol. 2, p. 380-381 (link).
Rebecca Blodget (1772-1837); E.T. Sale, Old Time Belles and Cavaliers, 1912, p. 212-218 (link).
Journal of the House, 20 Feb. 1826, p. 271 (link).
House Report on the petition of Rebecca Blodget, 22 Feb. 1828 (link).
Journal of the Senate, 19 Mar. 1832, p. 191 (link).
Senate Report on the petition of Rebecca Blodget, 4 May 1832 (link, link).
Library of Congress, Blodget's Hotel (link).  Public Domain Archive (link).
Library of Congress, Estate of Samuel Blodget (link).
W.B. Bryan, A History of the National Capital, 1914, vol. 1, p. 187-189, 205-208, 229-231, 528, 554-555, 631, etc. (link).
Allen Browne, Blodget's Hotel (link, link).
Wikipedia, 1836 U.S. Patent Office fire.
Ruins of the Post and Patent Offices, Burnt Dec. 15th 1836 (link).
National Archives, Recalling the Devastating Patent Office Fire of 1836, 2018 (link).
Conflagration - Post Office Building, 20 Jan. 1837, Serial Set 305, 24th Congress, 2nd Session, House Report no. 134 (link).
6 348d 19/1 102 20 May 1826 An Act for the relief of Jarvis Jackson.  Former postmaster.
6 367a 19/2 87 3 Mar. 1827 An Act for the relief of Haley and Harris.  Mail contractors.
6 376b 20/1 38 28 Apr. 1828 An Act for the relief of Asa Herring.  Surety.
6 410a 21/1 53 2 Apr. 1830 An Act for the relief of the legal representatives of Erastus Granger.  [why?]
Postmaster of Buffalo, NY, 1804-1818; cousin of Gideon Granger, Postmaster General, 1801-1814.
6 437a 21/1 158 29 May 1830 An Act for the relief of Fielding L. White.  Reward.
6 439c 21/1 171 29 May 1830 An Act for the relief of Isaiah Townsend, Peter Dox, and Gerrit Le Grange, sureties of Gerrit L. Dox.  Surety.
6 455b 21/2 44 2 Mar. 1831 An Act for the relief of William Clower.  Mail carrier.
6 514b 22/1 258 14 July 1832 An Act for the relief of Christopher Brooks.  Reward.
6 583c 23/1 188 30 June 1834 An Act for the relief of George Bowen.  Mail carrier.
6 598a 23/1 249 30 June 1834 An Act for the relief of John Chandler and William Johnson.  Surety.
6 665-666 24/1 284 2 July 1836 An Act for the relief of William B. Stokes, Richard C. Stockton, Lucius W. Stockton, and Daniel Moore.  Mail contractors.
6 672b 24/1 311 2 July 1836 An Act for the relief of Seaborn Jones and Joel Crawford.  Surety.
6 705-706 25/2 24 7 Mar. 1838 An Act for the relief of Thomas J. Lawler and Smith M. Miles.  Expenses.
6 709b 25/2 44 28 Mar. 1838 An Act for the relief of the legal representatives of Thomas W. Bacot, late of Charleston, South Carolina, deceased.  Post office construction.
6 713a 25/2 66 20 Apr. 1838 An Act for the relief of D.W. Haley.  Captured two mail robbers, slaves.
6 715b 25/2 76 20 Apr. 1838 An Act for the relief of James McMahon.  Expenses.
6 716d 25/2 83 21 May 1838 An Act directing the Postmaster-General to settle the claim of Hard and Longstreet.  Mail contractors.
6 750a 25/3 22 13 Feb. 1839 An Act for the relief of William B. Ferguson and sureties.  Special agent.
6 754d 25/3 49 2 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of Nathaniel Mitchell.  Payment.
6 755e 25/3 55 2 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of William Colt and William Donoldson.  Expenses.
6 770b 25/3 141 3 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of Richard Hendley.  Payment.
6 770c 25/3 142 3 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of Abel A. Pasko and others.  Release.
6 770d 25/3 143 3 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of John Brown and Company.  Mail carrier.
6 787c 25/3 210 3 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of Cornelius Taylor.  Mail carrier.
6 789c 25/3 219 3 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of Patrick Green.  Mail carrier.
6 792a 25/3 232 3 Mar. 1839 An Act for the relief of Jamison and Williamson.  Mail contractors.
6 801b 26/1 31 27 May 1840 An Act for the relief of A.G.S. Wight.  Surety.
6 813-816 26/1 99 21 July 1840 An Act for the relief of Chastelain and Ponvert, and for other purposes.  Funds for House Resolutions of 23 June 1840 (link), requesting a detailed report on Post Roads, § 13, p. 816.
6 822b 26/2 27 3 Mar. 1841 An Act for the relief of Avery, Saltmarsh, and Company.  Mail contractors.
6 838b 27/2 75 27 July 1842 An Act for the relief of Jabez L. and Asa White, of the state of Connecticut.  Mail contractors.
6
6
843-844
863d
27/2
27/2
100
197
27 July 1842
23 Aug. 1842
(1) An Act for the relief of Nathaniel Mitchell.  Payment.
(2) An Act for the relief of Nathaniel Mitchell.  Payment corrected.
6 848a 27/2 114 1 Aug. 1842 An Act for the relief of John P. Converse and Henry J. Rees.  Payment.
6 856b 27/2 155 11 Aug. 1842 An Act for the relief of Eli Wheat and Stephen White.  Surety.
6 861-862 27/2 175 16 Aug. 1842 An Act for the relief of Joseph F. Caldwell.  Mail contractor.
Claims, since the 23rd Congress (link).
6 864c 27/2 201 23 Aug. 1842 An Act for the relief of Hezekiah Cunningham.  Mail contractor.
6 864d 27/2 208 26 Aug. 1842 An Act for the relief of Charles D. Hammond and Augustus H. Kenan.  Surety.
6 867-868 27/2 224 26 Aug. 1842 An Act for the relief of Samuel R. Slaymaker.  Mail carrier.
6 882b 27/3 21 4 Feb. 1843 An Act for the relief of the Steamboat Company of Nantucket.  Mail carrier.
6 883a 27/3 25 4 Feb. 1843 An Act for the relief of Barent Stryker.  Mail carrier.
6 884b 27/3 37 18 Feb. 1843 An Act for the relief of William De Buys, postmaster at New Orleans.  Reimbursed for repairs to the New Orleans post office building.
6 884d 27/3 39 24 Feb. 1843 An Act for the relief of Samuel D. Rose and others.  Returning proceeds from a mail robbery.
6 889a 27/3 68 1 Mar. 1843 An Act for the relief of John Wharry.  Postmaster.
6 890-891 27/3 112 3 Mar. 1843 An Act for the relief of S. and M. Riche.  Surety.
6 900-901 27/3 157 3 Mar. 1843 An Act for the relief of Peters, Moore, and Company.  Mail carrier.
6 911b 28/1 34 31 May 1844 An Act for the relief of Adam L. Mills.  Mail carrier.
6 918d 28/1 110 17 June 1844 An Act for the relief of C.P. Sengstack.  Glass for the new post office building.
6 923a 28/1 130 17 June 1844 An Act for the relief of Manlius V. Thompson, sole executor of Milus W. Dickey, deceased.  Mail contractor.
6 937b 28/2 30 27 Feb. 1845 An Act for the relief of Walker, Kinkle, and Caruthers.  Mail contractor.
6 938d 28/2 49 3 Mar. 1845 An Act for the relief of Dunning R. McNair.  Mail contractor.

Private Resolutions, vol. 6, p. 1-942

Vol. Pages C/S No. Approved ... Title
6 816-817 26/1 2 16 May 1840 Joint Resolution for the relief of Masterson and Smith, and for other purposes.  Contractors for marble used in the new P.O. Dept. building.
6 876b 27/2 1 14 Apr. 1842 A Resolution to authorize the settlement of the accounts of George Whitman.  Mail contractor.
6 877b 27/2 11 31 Aug. 1842 A Resolution to authorize the Postmaster General to settle the accounts of Patton Pilcher and Company.  Mail contractor.
6 907b 27/3 9 3 Mar. 1843 Joint Resolution to authorize the Postmaster-General to settle with J. and P. Voorhies.  Mail contractor.
6 932b 28/1 7 31 May 1844 Joint Resolution to authorize the Postmaster-General to re-examine certain claims, and to allow one month's extra pay to certain mail contractors.




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US Statutes at Large, Volume 7, Treaties with the Indian Tribes, 1778-1842, published 1846, 1848, 1854, 1856, 1861

The introductory essay, Indian Treaties, consists of excerpts from Supreme Court decisions, reviewing the claims of European nations, and then the United States, to lands occupied by the Indian nations.
1846 1848, as 1846
1854 1856, as 1854, with secondary title between p. ii and iii. 1861, as 1856 but p. ii is blank
Accumulated from the editions of 1846 and 1854, PDF



There are four notable published compilations of Indian treaties.  Kappler's series is largely drawn from the Statutes at Large, and is considered definitive.

Indian Treaties, and Laws and Regulations Relating to Indian Affairs, Washington : Way & Gideon, 1826.
Treaties between the United States of America and the Several Indian Tribes, From 1778 to 1837, Washington : Langtree and O'Sullivan, 1837.
A Compilation of All the Treaties between the United States and the Indian Tribes Now in Force as Laws, Washington : Government Printing Office, 1873.
Charles J. Kappler, Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, Washington : Government Printing Office, 1904-1941, 1979.
National Archives, Native American Heritage, American Indian Treaties; Treaties by Date, Treaties by Tribe.
The Tribal Treaties Database, at Oklahoma State University, https://treaties.okstate.edu/, has links to the National Archives and Kappler.  It includes a new index to Kappler's vol. 2.  Fifteen treaties are noted with content related to mail routes and roads (link).



The first date is signatory, the later dates are ratification or proclamation.

Vol. Pages Approved ... Title
7 95-96 27 Oct. 1805
10 June 1806
Articles of a Treaty Between the United States of America, by their commissioners, Return J. Meigs and Daniel Smith, who are appointed to hold conferences with the Cherokees for the purpose of arranging certain interesting matters with the said Indians, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and head men of the Cherokees, of the other part.  Done at Tellico.

Art. 2, road from Tellico to Tombigbee, for the mail route from Knoxville to New Orleans.
Meigs was later Postmaster General, 1814-1823.

Previous to this treaty,
  • Motion respecting the Establishment of a Post Road from Knoxville, in the State of Tennessee, to the Settlements on the Tombigby River, in the Mississippi Territory, and from thence to New Orleans; also, for the Establishment of Post Road from [blank] in Georgia, to the said Settlement on the Tombigby, to intersect the former road at the most convenient point between Knoxville and the Tombigby, 7 Dec. 1804, https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015076001356  [Michigan]
  • House Journal, 7 Dec. 1804 to 23 Feb. 1805, p. 108 (link), p. 112-113 (link), p. 169-170 (link), p. 178-179 (link), p. 279-280 (link), p. 308-309 (link), p. 365-366 (link).
  • A post road was established from Knoxville to the Tombigby settlements, to intersect the post road from Athens, Georgia, to New Orleans, 3 Mar. 1805, 2 Stat. 338.


5 Aug. 1815
Chickasaw
ASP Misc 2, no 413, p. 401-402
7
7
333-339
340-342
(1) 27 Sep. 1830
24 Feb. 1831
(2) 28 Sep. 1830
(1) A Treaty of Perpetual Friendship, Cession and Limits, Entered into by John H. Eaton and John Coffee, for and in behalf of the Government of the United States, and the Mingoes, Chiefs, Captains and Warriors of the Choctaw Nation, begun and held at Dancing Rabbit Creek, on the fifteenth of September, in the year eighteen hundred and thirty.
(2) Supplementary Articles to the Preceding Treaty.

(1) Art. 11, "It is agreed further that the U.S. shall establish one or more Post Offices in said Nation, and may establish such military post roads, and posts, as they may consider necessary."
(2) Art. 4, land granted to John Donly of Alabama, "who for twenty years has carried the mail through the Choctaw Nation."

Wikipedia, Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, Choctaw Trail of Tears.
This was the first treaty following the Indian Removal Act of 28 May 1830, 4 Stat. 411.
7
7
381-387
388-391
(1) 20 Oct. 1832
1 Mar. 1833
(2) 22 Oct. 1832
(1) Articles of a Treaty Made and entered into between Genl. John Coffee, being duly authorized thereto, by the President of the United States, and the whole Chickasaw Nation, in General Council assembled, at the Council House, on Pontitock Creek on the twentieth day of October, 1832.
(2) Articles Supplementary to, and explanatory of, a Treaty which was entered into on the 20th instant, between General John Coffee on the part of the United States, and the whole Chickasaw nation in General Council assembled.

(1) Signed in the presence of John Donley, Tenn.  (2) Signed in presence of John Donley.
(2) "The Chickasaw nation request the Government to grant them a cross mail route through the nation as follows, ... ."
(2) "John Donley has long been known in this nation, as a mail carrier; ... ."
7 450-457 24 May 1834
1 July 1834
Articles of Convention and Agreement Proposed by the Commissioners on the part of the United States, in pursuance of the request made, by the Delegation representing the Chickasaw nation of Indians, and which have been agreed to.

Art. 14, "Also so much of the supplemental treaty as relates ... to the establishment of mail routes through the Chickasaw country; and as it respects the privilege given to John Donely, be, and the same are declared to be in full force."
7
7
478-487
488-777
(1) 29 Dec. 1835
23 May 1836
(2) 1 Mar. 1836
23 May 1836
(1) Articles of a treaty, concluded at New Echota in the State of Georgia on the 29th day of Decr. 1835 by General William Carroll and John F. Schermerhorn commissioners on the part of the United States and the Chiefs Head Men and People of the Cherokee tribe of Indians.
(2) Supplementary Articles to a Treaty Concluded at New Echota, Georgia, December 29, 1835, between the United States and the Cherokee people.

Art. 3, "The United States shall always have the right to make and establish such post and military roads and forts in any part of the Cherokee country, ... ."

Wikipedia, Treaty of New Echota, Cherokee removal.
11 611-619 22 June 1855
21 Feb. 1856
4 Mar. 1856
Articles of agreement and convention between the United States and the Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes of Indians, made and concluded at the city of Washington, the twenty-second day of June, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, Peter P. Pitchlynn, Israel Folsom, Samuel Garland, and Dixon W. Lewis, commissioners on the part of the Choctaws; and Edmund Pickens and Sampson Folsom, commissioners on the part of the Chickasaws.

Art. 17, "The United States shall have the right to establish and maintain such military posts, post-roads, and Indian agencies, as may be deemed necessary within the Choctaw and Chickasaw country, ..."
11 699-707 7 Aug. 1856
16 Aug. 1856
28 Aug. 1856
Articles of agreement and convention between the United States, and the Creek and Seminole tribes of Indians, made and concluded at the city of Washington the seventh day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, by George W. Manypenny, commissioner on the part of the United States, Tuck-a-batchee-Micco, Echo-Harjo, Chilly McIntosh, Benjamin Marshall, George W. Stidham, and Daniel N. McIntosh, commissioners on the part of the Creeks; and John Jumper, Tuste-nuc-o-chee, Pars-co-fer, and James Factor, commissioners on the part of the Seminoles.

Art. 19, "The United States shall have the right to establish and maintain such military posts, military and post-roads, and Indian agencies as may be deemed necessary within the Creek and Seminole country, ..."
18 689-692 1 Oct. 1863
26 June 1866
21 Oct. 1869
Treaty of Peace and Friendship made at Ruby Valley, in the Territory of Nevada, this first day of October, A. D. one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, between the United States of America, represented by the undersigned Commissioners, and the Western Bands of the Shoshonee Nation of Indians, represented by their Chiefs and Principal Men and Warriors.

Art. 1, "... the said bands stipulate and agree that hostilities and all depredations upon the emigrant trains, the mail and telegraph lines, and upon the citizens of the United States within their country, shall cease."
Art. 2, "... station houses may be erected and occupied at such points as may be necessary for the comfort and convenience of travellers or for the mail or telegraph companies."
13 673-679 7 Oct. 1863
25 Mar. 1864
14 Dec. 1864
Treaty between the United States of America and the Tabeguache Band of Utah Indians, concluded October 7, 1863.

Art. 3, "And it is further agreed that the United States shall have ... the right to locate, construct, and maintain railroads and other roads and highways through the same, and along the routes of United States mail lines, at suitable points, to establish and maintain stations."
13 681-684 12 Oct. 1863
7 Mar. 1864
17 Jan. 1865
Treaty between the United States of America and the Shoshonee-Goship Bands of Indians, concluded at Tuilla Valley, October 12, 1863.

Art. 1, "... the said bands stipulate and agree that hostilities and all depredations upon the emigrant trains, the mail and telegraph lines, and upon the citizens of the United States, within their country, shall cease."
Art. 2, "... and station-houses may be erected and occupied at such points as may be necessary for the comfort and convenience of travellers, or for the use of the mail or telegraph companies."
14 769-784 28 Apr. 1866
28 June 1866
10 July 1866
Articles of Agreement and Convention between the United States and the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations of Indians ...

Art. 44, "Post offices shall be established and maintained by the United States at convenient places in the Choctaw and Chickasaw nations, to and from which the mails shall be carried at reasonable intervals, at the rates of postage prevailing in the United States."
15 505-511 19 Feb. 1867
15 Apr. 1867
2 May 1867
Treaty between the United States of America and the Sissiton and Warpeton Bands of Dakota or Sioux Indians; Concluded February 19, 1867.

Art. 2, "The said bands hereby cede to the United States the right to construct wagon roads, railroads, mail stations, telegraph lines, ... ".
Art. 10, "It is further agreed that the said bands, parties to this treaty, will guarantee the safety of travel, of the transportation of the mails, supplies, etc., the protection of mail stations and property connected therewith, ...".
15 581-587 21 Oct. 1867
25 July 1868
25 Aug. 1868
Articles of a treaty and agreement made and entered into at the Council Camp, on Medicine Lodge creek, seventy miles south of Fort Larned, in the State of Kansas, on the twenty-first day of October, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, by and between the United States of America, represented by its commissioners duly appointed thereto, to wit, Nathaniel G. Taylor, William S. Harney, C. C. Augur, Alfred S.[H.] Terry, John B. Sanborn, Samuel F. Tappan, and J. B. Henderson, of the one part, and the confederated tribes of Kiowa and Comanche Indians, represented by their chiefs and headmen, duly authorized and empowered to act for the body of the people of said tribes, (the names of said chiefs and head-men being hereto subscribed,) of the other part.

Art. 11, part 6, "... they [the said tribes] further expressly agree ... they will not, in future, object to the construction of railroads, wagon roads, mail stations, ...".
15 593-599 28 Oct. 1867
25 July 1868
19 Aug. 1868
Articles of a treaty and agreement made and entered into at the Council Camp on Medicine Lodge creek, seventy miles south of Fort Larned, in the State of Kansas, on the twenty-eighth day of October, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, by and between the United States of America, represented by its commissioners duly appointed thereto, to wit: Nathaniel G. Taylor, William S. Harney, C. C. Augur, Alfred H. Terry, John B. Sanborn, Samuel F. Tappan and John B. Henderson, of the one part, and the Cheyenne and Arapahoe tribes of Indians, represented by their chiefs and head-men duly authorized and empowered to act for the body of the people of said tribes—the names of said chiefs and head-men being hereto subscribed—of the other part.

Art. 11, part 6, "... they, the said tribes, further expressly agree ... they will not in future object to the construction of railroads, wagon roads, mail stations, ...".
15 635-647 29 Apr. 1868
16 Feb. 1869
24 Feb. 1869
Articles of a treaty made and concluded by and between Lieutenant-General William T. Sherman, General William S. Harney, General Alfred H. Terry, General C. C. Augur, J. B. Henderson, Nathaniel G. Taylor, John B. Sanborn, and Samuel F. Tappan, duly appointed commissioners on the part of the United States, and the different bands of the Sioux Nation of Indians, by their chiefs and headmen, whose names are hereto subscribed, they being duly authorized to act in the premises.

Art. 11, part 6, "... they, the said Indians, further expressly agree ... they will not in future object to the construction of railroads, wagon roads, mail stations, ...".
15 667-672 1 June 1868
25 July 1868
12 Aug. 1868
Articles of a treaty and agreement made and entered into at Fort Sumner, New Mexico, on the first day of June, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight, by and between the United States, represented by its commissioners, Lieutenant-General W. T. Sherman and Colonel Samuel F. Tappan, of the one part, and the Navajo nation or tribe of Indians, represented by their chiefs and headmen, duly authorized and empowered to act for the whole people of said nation or tribe, (the names of said chiefs and headmen being hereto subscribed,) of the other part.

Art. 9, part 6, "... they, the said Indians, further expressly agree ... They will not in future oppose the construction of railroads, wagon roads, mail stations, ...".


A small selection of treaties involving land cessions and transfers,
For a comprehensive list of land cessions, 1784-1894, with references to the Statutes, see



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US Statutes at Large, Volume 8, Treaties with Foreign Nations, 1778-1845, published 1846, 1848, 1853, 1857, 1867

1846 1848 1853 1857, as 1853
1867, as 1853, with Index to the Treaties Accumulated from the editions of 1846, 1848, and 1867, PDF
Notes

Treaties and Postal Conventions, vol. 8, p. 1-613; vol. 18 part 2, treaties in force in 1873

Vol. Pages Approved ... Title
-- -- 10 Feb. 1763 Treaty of Paris.  End of the Seven Years' War (1756-1763) in Europe, and the French and Indian War (1754-1763) in North America.  Signed by Britain, France, Spain, and agreed by Portugal.  Canada and all French claims east of the Mississippi were ceded to Britain.  Louisiana, west of the Mississippi, including New Orleans, was ceded by France to Spain.  Florida, east of the Mississippi, was ceded by Spain to Britain; Cuba was returned to Spain from British occupation.  British colonial claims were thus limited westward to the Mississippi, ending the "sea-to-sea" claims of the original charters.

By the Royal Proclamation of 7 Oct. 1763, British colonial settlements were to be limited further, east of a line through the Appalachian Mountains, which was later modified by treaties with the Iroquois, Cherokee, etc.

Wikipedia, Treaty_of_Fontainebleau_(1762), Seven Years' War, French and Indian War, French and Indian Wars, Treaty of Paris (1763), Royal Proclamation of 1763.
Wikisource, Treaty of Paris (1763).
US State Dept., https://history.state.gov/milestones/1750-1775/treaty-of-paris
-- -- 1765-1766 British Stamp Act passed (royal assent 22 Mar. 1765, 5 Geo. III c. 12) and repealed (royal assent 18 Mar. 1766, 6 Geo. III c. 11).
Wikipedia, Stamp Act 1765.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Repeal of the Stamp Act, 29 May 2016 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
-- -- 1765-1783 Wikipedia, American Revolution, American Revolutionary War.
8
8
17

18.2
18.2
18.2
6-11
12-31
795-796

201-203
203-213
213
6 Feb. 1778
4 May 1778
Treaty of Alliance Between the United States of America and His Most Christian Majesty [France].
Treaty of Amity and Commerce ... .
Additional Separate and Secret Article ... .

Notes, Treaties and conventions between the United States and France, 1778-1831, p. 6-7.

Journals of the Continental Congress, vol. 11, p. 418-458.
Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 468-483.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 3-47.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 7, p. 763-776, p. 777-780, p. 781-782.
Repudiated, Act of 7 July 1798, 1 Stat. 578.

Commemorative postage stamp -- French Alliance, 4 May 1978 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
8
18.2
54-57
261-264
30 Nov. 1782
15 Apr. 1783
Provisional Articles Between the United States of America, and his Britannic Majesty.  Independence of the United States; northern, western, southern and eastern boundaries; British armies to be withdrawn; separate article concerning West Florida.
Notes, Treaties and conventions between the United States and Britain, 1782-1842, p. 54.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 580-584.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 96-107; see the notes on p. 101-104, concerning overseas letters and copies of the treaty.  Separate article, concerning West Florida, not ratified, p. 101, 105.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 1-5.
British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 1, p. 773-777.
8
18.2
58-61
264-265
20 Jan. 1783 Armistice Declaring a cessation of hostilities between the United States and Great-Britain.  Britain yielded East and West Florida to Spain.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 584-585.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 108-114.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 6-7.
British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 1, p. 777-779.
On the same date, preliminaries of peace between Great Britain and France, and between Great Britain and Spain.

Commemorative postage stamp -- General George Washington's proclamation of peace, 19 Apr. 1933 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC).
8
18.2
60-79
722-731
3 Apr. 1783 Treaty of Amity and Commerce, Concluded between his Majesty the King of Sweden and the United States of America.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 1725-1735.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 123-150.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 11, p. 710-722.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Treaty with Sweden, 24 Mar. 1983 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
8
18.2
80-83
266-269
3 Sep. 1783
14 Jan. 1784
12 May 1784
Definitive Treaty of Peace Between the United States of America and his Britannic Majesty.  The US was now bounded on the north and south by British Canada and Spanish Florida, on the east and west by the Atlantic Ocean and the Mississippi River.  Spain was then in control of the territory west of the Mississippi, and disputed the placement of the Florida boundary.

Journals of the Continental Congress, vol. 26, p. 22-31.
Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 586-590.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 151-157.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 8-12.
British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 1, p. 779-783.
Wikipedia, Peace_of_Paris_(1783), Treaty_of_Paris_(1783).

Commemorative postage stamp -- Treaty of Paris, 2 Sep. 1983 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
8
18.2
100-105
516-521
Jan. 1787 Treaty of Peace and Friendship Between the United States of America, and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Morocco.  Proclaimed 18 July 1787.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 1206-1212.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 185-227.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 9, p. 1278-1285.

Commemorative postage stamp -- Friendship with Morocco, 17 July 1987 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
8
8
8
8
18.2
116-129
130-131
131-132
196-197
269-287
19 Nov. 1794
4 May 1796
15 Mar. 1798
8 Jan. 1802
all above
Treaty of Amity, Commerce and Navigation, Between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America.  Withdrawal of British forces from the Northwest Territory, 1794-1796.  The northern borders of present-day Maine and Minnesota were largely settled, with further details in 1798 and 1818.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 590-612.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 245-274, p. 346-348, p. 427-429, p. 430-432 (25 Oct. 1798), p. 488-491.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 13-33, p. 34-35, p. 36-37, p. 38-40.
British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 1, p. 784-810.
Wikipedia, Jay Treaty.
8
18.2
138-153
704-711
27 Oct. 1795
2 Aug. 1796
Treaty of Friendship, Limits and Navigation, Between the United States of America, and the King of Spain.  The northern boundary of Spanish Florida was confirmed, with the Mississippi River as the western boundary of the US, above 31° N.
Notes, Treaties between the United States and Spain, 1795-1819, with court decisions, p. 138-139.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 1640-1649.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 318-345.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 11, p. 516-525.
Wikipedia, Pinckney's Treaty.

Spain claimed Florida in 1513, but lost it to Britain in the Treaty of Paris, 10 Feb. 1763 (ref).  By decree of 7 Oct. 1763 (ref, ref, ref), Britain divided Florida into East and West.  West Florida then extended from the Mississippi River to the Apalachicola River, and northward to 31° N.  East Florida then extended eastward from the Apalachicola, and northward along the Chattahoochee River to the Flint River, then to the St. Mary's River and the Atlantic.  In July 1764, Britain enlarged West Florida northward to the Yazoo River, approx. 32° 28′ N, between the Mississippi and Chattahoochee Rivers; West Florida then included Pensacola and Natchez (ref, ref, ref, ref).  By the Treaty of Paris, 3 Sep. 1783, Britain ceded West Florida between 31° N and 32° 28′ N to the US (the basis of Mississippi Territory in 1798), and the balance of West Florida below 31° N and all of East Florida to Spain.
8
18.2
198-201
711-712
11 Aug. 1802 A Convention Between his Catholic Majesty [Spain] and the United States of America, ...

Negotiated for Spain by "Don Pedro Cevallos, Counsellor of State, Gentleman of the Bed Chamber in employment, first Secretary of State and universal despatch, and Superintendent General of the Posts and Post Offices, in Spain and the Indies; ...".
8
18.2
200-213
232-238
30 Apr. 1803
21 Oct. 1803
Treaty between the United States of America and the French Republic.  The Louisiana Purchase.  Two further conventions, same date.  Formal possession, 20 Dec. 1803.  See also, Act of 31 Oct. 1803, 2 Stat. 245.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 508-521.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 498-528.  News of the treaty did not reach Washington until 14 July 1803 (ref).
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 7, p. 812-815, p. 816-817, p. 818-821.
Thorpe, p. 1359, p. 1364, has some historical notes.
Wikipedia, Louisiana Purchase, François Barbé-Marbois (negotiator for France).
Library of Congress, Louisiana Purchase, Legislative Timeline, 1802-1807.
Library of Congress, A Question of Boundaries.
François Barbé-Marbois, History of Louisiana and of Its Cession to the United States of Northern America; Preceded by a Discourse on the Constitution and Government of the United States, 1830. (link).

France claimed the Mississippi River basin (including its tributaries) since 1682.  That territory was surrendered to Britain (east of the Mississippi) and Spain (west of the Mississippi), in 1763 (ref).  Spain ceded Louisiana to France, by secret treaty, 1 Oct. 1800 (ref), with formal transfer 30 Nov. 1803 (ref).  See also, notes on treaties with France, 8 Stat. 6, and Spain, 8 Stat. 138, 8 Stat. 252.  The purchased territory consisted of the Mississippi River drainage basin, west of the Mississippi, excepting Spanish territory, but none of this was clearly defined; the borders with Spain/Mexico and Spain/Florida were not fully resolved until the treaty of 1819.

Commemorative postage stamps -- Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 30 Apr. 1904 (five stamps, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC); the map on the 10c stamp (NPM, NPM, NPMA, MSC, ST, WC) includes West Florida with Louisiana, which was a point of dispute with Spain from 1803 to 1821.
Commemorative postage stamps -- Louisiana Purchase, 30 Apr. 1953 (NPM, NPMA, MSC, WC, WC), 30 Apr. 2003 (NPM, NPMA, MSC).
8
18.2
218-223
287-292
24 Dec. 1814
17 Feb. 1815
Treaty of Peace and Amity, Between his Britannic Majesty and the United States of America.  Further revisions of the northern border, but not complete agreement until a decision of 18 June 1822, 8 Stat. 274.
Further, 18.2 Stat. 296-297, 18.2 Stat. 300-302.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 612-624.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 574-584.  Further, vol. 2, p. 655-657; vol. 3, p. 65-76.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 41-48.
Hertslet's Commercial Treaties, vol. 2, p. 378-386.
Wikipedia, War of 1812, Treaty of Ghent.

News of the treaty reached New York seven weeks later (12 Feb. 1815).
8
18.2
248-251
297-300
20 Oct. 1818
30 Jan. 1819
Convention with Great Britain.  Joint control of the Oregon Country for ten years.  Northern boundary of the US east of the Rocky Mountains set at 49° N.  Oregon Country extended from 42° N to 54° 40′ N, between the Continental Divide and the Pacific; it was divided in 1846 at 49° N.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 631-633.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 658-662.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 57-60.
Hertslet's Commercial Treaties, vol. 2, p. 392-395.
Wikipedia, Treaty of 1818.  Wikisource, Treaty of 1818.

Treaty with Spain, 22 Feb. 1819, 8 Stat. 252, setting the southern limit of Oregon Country at 42° N.
Convention with Russia, 5/17 Apr. 1824, 8 Stat. 302, 18.2 Stat. 664, setting the northern limit of Oregon Country at 54° 40′ N; Miller, Treaties, vol. 3, p. 151-162.
Convention between Britain and Russia, 16/28 Feb. 1825, similar; British and Foreign State Papers, vol. 12, p. 38-43.
Continued to 1846 by Convention of 6 Aug. 1827, 8 Stat. 360, Convention of 29 Sep. 1827, 8 Stat. 362.

Joint Resolution concerning the Oregon Territory, 27 Apr. 1846, 9 Stat. 109, gave notice to abrogate the treaty.

Miller, Treaties, vol. 3, p. 309-314, p. 319-385.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 74-75, p. 78-81.
8
18.2
252-273
712-718
22 Feb. 1819
22 Feb. 1821
Treaty of Amity, Settlement and Limits, Between the United States and his Catholic Majesty [Spain].  Spain ceded Florida to the US, eastward of the Mississippi River.  The western boundary of the US was defined, along the Sabine River (at the Gulf of Mexico) to 32° N to the Red River to 100° W (of London), or 23° W (of Washington), to the Arkansas River to its source, then along 42° N to the Pacific Ocean.  Formal possession 10 July 1821 (East Florida), 17 July 1821 (West Florida).
Notes, Acts and court decisions relative to treaties with Spain, p. 252-255.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 2, p. 1651-1658.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 3, p. 3-64.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 11, p. 528-536.
Annals of Congress, vol. 37, col. 1337-1469.  Correspondence relevant to the treaty.
Wikipedia, Adams-Onís Treaty.

Exposition of the Treaty with Spain of February 22, 1819, in relation to Spanish Grants of Land in Louisiana, between the Perdido and Mississippi Rivers, Senate Document, 14 Jan. 1835, republished in American State Papers, Public Lands, vol. 7, p. 564-580 (link).  "The United States never had a legitimate claim to this territory until 1819.", p. 565-566 (link).
8
18.2
572-577
315-320
9 Aug. 1842
10 Nov. 1842
A Treaty To settle and define the boundaries between the territories of the United States and the possessions of Her Britannic Majesty in North America; for the final suppression of the African slave trade; and for the giving up of criminals fugitive from justice, in certain cases.  Northern boundaries of Maine, New Hampshire and Minnesota.

Malloy, Treaties, vol. 1, p. 650-656.
Miller, Treaties, vol. 4, p. 363-477.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 12, p. 82-89.
For marking the boundary, Act of 3 Mar. 1843, 5 Stat. 623.
Wikipedia, Webster-Ashburton Treaty.

Congress had been ready to go to war with Britain over the Maine boundary; Act of 3 Mar. 1839, 5 Stat. 355.
8 584-589 6 Mar. 1844
22 Feb. 1845
Postal Convention Between the United States of North America and the Republic of New Granada [Colombia].  Mails across Panama, etc.  Effective 20 Dec. 1844, when ratifications were exchanged.

Miller, Treaties, vol. 4, p. 529-538, with extensive notes, p. 534-538.
Bevans, Treaties, vol. 6, p. 865-867.
-- -- 28 Dec. 1844
14 Feb. 1845
Postal Convention, with Great Britain, for closed mails between Boston and Canada.
Authorized by the Resolution of 15 June 1844, 5 Stat. 718.  Not published; for the text from the British Post Office archives, see Miller, Treaties, vol. 5, p. 478-479.




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US Statutes at Large, Volume 9, 1845-1851, published 1851, 1854, 1857, 1862

This volume contains acts of the Twenty-ninth through Thirty-first Congresses.

Texas was admitted to the Union, 29 Dec. 1845, 9 Stat. 1 and 9 Stat. 108; Iowa, 28 Dec. 1846, 9 Stat. 117; Wisconsin, 29 May 1848, 9 Stat. 233.

California was obtained from Mexico by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, 2 Feb. 1848, 9 Stat. 922; it had a military government from 7 July 1846 to 20 Dec. 1849, with a customs collection district from 10 Mar. 1849, 9 Stat. 400, then a local civil government until it became a state 9 Sep. 1850, 9 Stat. 452.  The California Gold Rush began in Jan. 1848 (discovery) and Aug. 1848 (first extensive reports).

Oregon was organized as a Territory, 14 Aug. 1848, 9 Stat. 323; Minnesota, 3 Mar. 1849, 9 Stat. 403; Utah, 9 Sep. 1850, 9 Stat. 453; New Mexico, 9 Sep. 1850, 9 Stat. 446, with the boundary settled 13 Dec. 1850 by proclamation, 9 Stat. 1005.